? 10 Tourist Destinations in GERMANY ??

? 10 Tourist Destinations in GERMANY ??


10 Tourist Destinations In Germany Germany Prepare for a roller coaster of feasts, treats
and temptations as you take in Germany’s soul-stirring scenery, spirit-lifting culture,
big-city beauties, romantic palaces and half-timbered towns. Bewitching Scenery
There’s something undeniably artistic in the way Germany’s scenery unfolds the corrugated,
dune-fringed coasts of the north; the moody forests, romantic river valleys and vast vineyards of the centre, and the off-the-charts splendour
of the Alps, carved into rugged glory by glaciers and the elements. All are integral parts of a magical natural
matrix that’s bound to give your camera batteries a workout. Get off the highway and into the great outdoors
to soak up the epic landscapes that makes each delicious, slow,
winding mile so precious. Berlin Berlin is an edgy city, from its fashion to
its architecture to its charged political history. The Berlin Wall is a sobering reminder of
the hyper-charged postwar atmosphere, and yet the graffiti art that now covers its remnants
has become symbolic of social progress. Berlin is a big
multicultural metropolis but deep down it maintains the unpretentious charm of an international village. Locals follow the credo ‘live and let live’
and put greater emphasis on personal freedom and a creative lifestyle than on material
wealth and status symbols. Cafes are jammed at all hours, drinking is a religious rite and clubs keep
going until the wee hours or beyond. Size-wise,
Berlin is pretty big but its key areas are wonderfully compact and easily navigated on
foot, by bike or by using public transport. Munich The natural habitat of well-heeled power dressers
and Lederhosen-clad thigh-slappers, Mediterranean-style street cafes and Mitteleuropa
beer halls, highbrow art and high-tech industry, Germany’s unofficial southern capital is a
flourishing success story that revels in its own
contradictions. If you’re looking for Alpine clich’s, they’re
all here, but the Bavarian metropolis has many an unexpected card down its Dirndl.But
whatever else this city is, it’s popular. Statistics show Munich is enticing more visitors
than ever, especially in summer and during Oktoberfest, when the entire planet seems
to arrive to toast the town.Munich’s walkable centre
retains a small-town air but holds some world-class sights, especially art galleries and museums. Throw in royal Bavarian heritage, an entire
suburb of Olympic legacy and a kitbag of dark tourism,
and it’s clear why southern Germany’s metropolis is such a favourite among those who seek out
the past but like to hit the town once they’re done. Hamburg Hamburg’s historic label, The gateway to the
world, might be a bold claim, but Germany’s second-largest
city and biggest port has never been shy.Hamburg has engaged in business with the world ever
since it joined the Hanseatic League back in the Middle Ages. Its role as a centre of international trade
in the late 19th and early 20th centuries brought it great wealth
(and Unesco World Heritage recognition in 2015), a legacy that continues today: it’s one of Germany’s wealthiest cities. Hamburg’s maritime spirit infuses the entire
city; from architecture to menus to the cry of gulls, you always know
you’re near the water. The city has given rise to vibrant neighbourhoods
awash with multicultural eateries, as well as the gloriously
seedy Reeperbahn red-light district. Hamburg nurtured the early promise of the
Beatles, and today its distinctive live- and electronic-music scene thrives in
unique harbourside venues.The city’s attractions are only matched by
its inherent tempting spirit. Come, Hamburg says, have a ball. Cologne Cologne (Köln) offers seemingly endless attractions,
led by its famous cathedral whose filigree twin spires dominate
the skyline. It’s regularly voted the country’s single
most popular tourist attraction. The city’s museum landscape is especially
strong when it comes to art; but also has something in store for fans of
chocolate, sports and even Roman history. Its people are well known for their liberalism
and joie de vivre; and it’s easy to have a good time right along
with them year-round in the beer halls of the Altstadt (old town)
or during the springtime Carnival. Cologne is like a 3D textbook on history and
architecture. Drifting about town you’ll stumble upon an
ancient Roman wall, medieval churches galore, nondescript
postwar buildings, avant-garde structures and even a new postmodern
quarter right on the Rhine. Germany’s fourth-largest city was
founded by the Romans in 38 BC and given the lofty name Colonia Claudia Ara Aggripinensium. It grew into a major trading centre, a tradition
it solidified in the Middle Ages and continues to uphold today. Dresden Explore the treasures and grand buildings
of this baroque beauty, which is bisected by the majestic Elbe River. Dresden’s cultural heyday came under the 18th-century
reign of Augustus the Strong (August der Starke) and his son Augustus III, who produced many of Dresden’s
iconic buildings, including the Zwinger and the Frauenkirche. On the banks of the lovely Elbe River, the
German city of Dresden is lush and green, filled with forests and gardens
and parks. The city is rich with cultural and artistic
history; the great operatic composer Wilhelm Wagner debuted a number of works here in the 1800s and, today,
an independent light opera company keeps the classical art form modern and fresh. Culture vultures will love the Gemäldegalerie
Alte Meister and Grünes Gewölbe museums, and architecture buffs will salivate over
the mélange of styles reflected in the cityscape.Take some time to get to
know this fascinating, contradictory city. Frankfurt Frankfurt is ripe with culture, restaurants,
history, and it’s the center of banking and business in Europe. It’s a modern city with some great dining. Eat dinner at one of their famous cider houses,
experience the flavor of Frankfurt’s local dishes, relax at a beer
garden, spend the afternoon at one of the free parks,
or soak up the city’s history in a museum. There’s plenty to see and do in this 2,000-year-old
German city. The gothic Saint Bartholomeus Cathedral
is a perseverant structure, having been destroyed and rebuilt twice since its 14th century construction. Catch a screening at the German Film Museum,
stroll the exhibit halls of one of Frankfurt’s many galleries, or climb to the top of the
Main Tower for sweeping 360-degree views of the city. Düsseldorf Düsseldorf impresses with boundary-pushing
architecture, zinging nightlife and an art scene to rival many
higher profile cities. It’s a posh and modern city that seems all
buttoned-up business at first glance: banking, advertising,
fashion and telecommunications are among the fields that have made North Rhine-Westphalia’s
capital one of Germany’s wealthiest cities. Yet all it takes is a few hours of bar-hopping
around the Altstadt, the historical quarter along the Rhine,
to realise that locals have no problem letting their hair down once they shed those Armani
jackets. The Altstadt may claim to be the ‘longest
bar in the world’ but some attention has strayed to Medienhafen,
a redeveloped harbour area and a festival of international avant-garde architecture. Older neighbourhoods are also evolving. Case in point: Flingern, which has gone from
drab to fab in recent years and has a multifaceted arty boho scene. Nuremberg (Nürnberg), Bavaria’s second-largest city
and the unofficial capital of Franconia, is an energetic place where
the nightlife is intense and the beer is as dark as coffee. As one of Bavaria’s biggest draws it is alive
with visitors year-round, but especially during the spectacular
Christmas market. For centuries, Nuremberg was the undeclared
capital of the Holy Roman Empire and the preferred residence
of most German kings, who kept their crown jewels here. Rich and stuffed with architectural wonders,
it was also a magnet for famous artists, though the most famous of all,
Albrecht Dürer, was actually born here. Nuremberg shines throughout Germany like a
sun among the moon and stars, gushed Martin Luther. By the 19th century,
the city had become a powerhouse in Germany’s industrial revolution. Stuttgart Magnificent panorama and splendid architecture,
cultural diversity and traditional festivals – Stuttgart,
the state capital of Baden-Württemberg, delights its visitors. Due to the numerous green stripes, parks, woods and historic buildings, some people
take Stuttgart for the “paradise of Swabia”. Reflected by the awareness
of life experienced staying here, this paradise gets an even higher reputation. In other words, the ability to enjoy the city almost causes something like ease,
even you find yourself surrounded by the original, down-to-earth Swabes. Highlights include the famous State Theatre,
the large State Gallery, the Museum of Natural History and the Weißenhof settlement. Whether it’s culture or relaxation, Shopping
fun or musical theatre – there’s lots to do and see in Stuttgart:
Discover over 125 years of automobile history at Mercedes-Benz Museum and Porsche Museum,
enjoy the world famous Stuttgart ballet, celebrate at Stuttgart’s
beer festival or soak up the unique atmosphere at the Christmas market. Moreover, chapels and palaces can be found
all around the city and do not forget to spot one of the wine yards just around the corner. After a long day of sightseeing, you might
want to relax in the mineral spas in the city or
just finish the evening with a perfect glass of wine or beer. Come to the south of Germany and enjoy! Leipzig The largest city in Germany’s federal state
of Saxony, Leipzig is known for its vibrant arts and culture scene
shaped by famous music composers like Bach, Richard Wagner and Felix Mendelssohn. Tourists today can enjoy performances of Bach’s
music at the St. Thomas Church where Bach once served as choir
leader and is now buried. In addition to historic sites like the Old
Town Hall, the city boasts several impressive structures such as the
Napoleonic Monument to the Battle of the Nations and Reichsgericht, the former high court of
the Reich. One of Europe’s largest town squares, the
Augustusplatz, is situated at the central campus Germany’s second oldest
university.

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