๐Ÿ”Ÿ10 Tourist Destinations in AUSTRIA ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡น

๐Ÿ”Ÿ10 Tourist Destinations in AUSTRIA ๐Ÿ‡ฆ๐Ÿ‡น


10. Tourist Destinations In Austria 10. Tourist Destinations In Austria Austria is a German-speaking country in Central
Europe, characterized by mountain villages, baroque architecture, Imperial history and rugged Alpine terrain. Vienna, its Danube River capital, is home
to the Schönbrunn and Hofburg palaces. It has counted Mozart, Strauss and Freud among
its residents. The country’s other notable regions include
the northern Bohemian Forest, Traunsee Lake and eastern hillside vineyards. An overview of Tourist Destinations that you
can choose during your vacation in Austria: Bregenz What a view! Ah yes, the locals proudly agree, Bregenz
does indeed have the loveliest of views: before you the Bodensee, Europe’s third-largest lake, spreads
out like a liquid mirror; behind you the Pfänder (1064m) climbs to the Alps; to the right you see Germany, to
the left the faint outline of Switzerland. Just wow. Whether contemplating avant-garde art and
architecture by the new harbour, sauntering along the promenade on a summer’s evening or watching opera under
the stars at the much-lauded Festspiele (festival), you can’t help but think – clichéd though it sounds – that
Vorarlberg’s pocket-sized capital has got at least a taste of it all. Hallstatt With pastel-coloured houses that cast shimmering
reflections onto the glassy waters of the lake and with towering mountains on all sides, Hallstatt’s
beauty alone would be enough to guarantee it fame. Boats chug tranquilly across the lake from the train
station to the village, situated precariously on a narrow stretch of land between mountain and shore. (So small is the patch of land occupied by
the village that its annual Corpus Christi procession takes place largely in small boats
on the lake.) The sheer volume of visitors here can be nerve-fraying, especially in summer, with a sea of cars,
buses and tour groups descending. The centre of Hallstatt is at Hallstatt Markt, and Hallstatt Lahn is on the edge of
town near the funicular to the Salzbergwerk. The train station is across the lake from Hallstatt; to get into town
you have to take the ferry. Innsbruck Famous for hosting the Winter Olympics twice,
in 1964 and 1976, the city of Innsbruck is widely considered to be one of the best winter sports destinations
in the world. Visitors not so keen on skiing or snowboarding,
or those visiting during the summer months can find
plenty to do in the historic city as well, including exploring the Innsbruck Cathedral,
the bell-making museum, or a number of local restaurants. Tyrol’s capital is a sight to behold. The jagged rock spires of the Nordkette range
are so close that within minutes it’s possible to travel from the city’s heart to
over 2000m above sea level and alpine pastures where
cowbells chime. Summer and winter activities abound, and it’s
understandable why some visitors only take a peek at Innsbruck proper before heading for the hills. But to do so is a shame, for Innsbruck is
in many ways Austria in microcosm: its late-medieval Altstadt is picture-book
stuff, presided over by a grand Habsburg palace and
baroque cathedral, while its Olympic ski jump with
big mountain views make a spectacular leap between the urban and the outdoors. Kitzbuhel Ask an Austrian to rattle off the top ski
resorts in the country, and Kitzbühel will invariably make the grade. Ever since Franz Reisch slipped on skis and
whizzed down the slopes of Kitzbüheler Horn way back in 1893, so christening the first alpine ski run in Austria,
Kitzbühel has carved out its reputation as one of Europe’s foremost ski resorts. Legends have been made and born on these pistes,
not least three-time Olympic medallist Toni Sailer. Kitzbühel began life in the 16th century
as a silver and copper mining town, and today continues to preserve a charming medieval centre despite its other
persona as a fashionable and prosperous winter resort. It’s renowned for the white-knuckled Hahnenkamm-Rennen downhill
ski race in January and the excellence of its slopes. klagenfurt Klagenfurt may not be up there with Vienna
or Graz in terms of urban lifestyle, but it’s an enjoyable, vibrant and sunny city with a compact Inner
Stadt and offers easy access to lakeside villages on and around the beautiful Wörthersee. At the city’s western limit is the wide green
space of Europapark along with Austria’s largest bathing complex. It’s a surprisingly lively place, both as
a playground for partiers down at the lido in summer and as a university town the rest of the year.Its
emblem is the Lindwurm, a winged dragon, of which there is a fountain on the main square, Neuer Platz. Nearby, frescoes and reliefs adorn the opulent
1500s cathedral. Baroque and Renaissance buildings line the narrow streets
around Alter Platz, with its yellow 17th-century Old Town Hall. Melk With its blockbuster abbey-fortress set high
above the valley, Melk is a high point of any visit to the Danube Valley. Separated from the river by a stretch of woodland,
this pretty town makes for an easy and rewarding day trip from Krems or even Vienna. Combine a visit with nearby renaissance-era
Schloss Schallaburg, 6km south of town, and you have yourself a day packed with architectural
interest.Melk is one of the most popular destinations in Austria so you certainly won’t be alone on
its cobbled streets. It’s also one of the few places in the Wachau
that has a pulse in winter, making it a year-round
option. Salzburg Situated near Germany’s southern border with
Austria, the city of Salzburg, like its capital counterpart, is famous for its long-standing musical traditions,
including being the birthplace of Wolfgang Mozart. Beyond the many examples of historic architecture
and artistic attractions found in the city, Salzburg is surrounded by the breathtakingly epic Alps
mountain range, affording visitors and residents alike the ability to explore the experiential contrast of rich
history and stunning natural beauty simultaneously. Beyond Salzburg’s two biggest money-spinners
– Mozart and The Sound of Music – hides a city with a burgeoning arts scene, wonderful food, manicured parks,
quiet side streets where classical music wafts from open windows, and concert halls that uphold musical tradition
365 days a year. Everywhere you go, the scenery, the skyline,
the music and the history send your spirits soaring
higher than Julie Andrews’ octave-leaping vocals. Salzkammergut a UNESCO World Heritage Site – is an Austrian
resort area surrounded by serene blue lakes, verdant hills, and snow- peaked mountain ranges, that for over a century
has served as one of the countries prime tourist destinations. Outdoor recreational activities are prominent
in the area, including mountaineering, horseback riding, swimming and cycling. The Salzkammergut region is also famous for
the many luxury spas and hotel resorts inhabiting the area, making it an idyllic destination for groups
of travelers looking for both relaxation and adventure. Vienna Baroque streetscapes and imperial palaces
set the stage for Vienna’s artistic and musical masterpieces alongside its coffee-house culture and vibrant epicurean
and design scenes. Known for the many diverse architectural styles
peppered throughout the city, travelers can expect to find numerous well-preserved examples of Romanesque, Baroque,
Classicist, and Art Nouveau styled structures. Vienna is also celebrated for its rich performance-art
tradition, hosting over 200 balls a year, and a variety of classical music concerts honoring the many
famous composers who once called Vienna home, including Beethoven, Mozart, Brahms, and countless others. Zell am See For travelers who are looking for the ultimate
in natural scenery, and wilderness adventures, the town of Zell am See is a ‘must-visit’ destination in Austria. Surrounded by majestic alpine mountains, world-class
ski slopes, and tranquil blue lakes, Zell am See hosts numerous
outdoor recreation events throughout the year, including a number ski and snowboard competitions. Zell am See, is an instant heart-stealer,
with its bluer-than-blue lake (Zeller See), pocket-sized centre studded with brightly painted chalets, and the snowcapped
peaks of the Hohe Tauern that lift your gaze to postcard heaven. You can dive into the lake and cycle its leafy
shores, hike and ski in the mountains and drive high on the Grossglockner Road. Every year, more than one million visitors
from all round the world – from families to playboys in souped-up Mustangs – do just that, in search of the
Austrian dream.

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