Camping near Carlsbad Caverns NP + tips for visiting

Camping near Carlsbad Caverns NP + tips for visiting


In this video we want to share some tips
for visiting Carlsbad Caverns and where we camped with our RV. Let’s first
review the ranger-led tours that we did at Carlsbad Caverns, and if you haven’t
seen them yet check out our videos about each of the ranger-led tour. Links in the
description below. So those are the four different ranger-led tours that we did.
We did the self-guided natural entrance, we did the king’s palace, we did the
left-hand tunnel, lower cave and last, but not least Slaughter Canyon. I think all
four of them were very different and great in their own way. And I would
thoroughly recommend if you are coming here, research the different tours. Don’t
just sort of pick one at random. Decide which one you think is most interesting.
And if you can, do multiple because they really are very different and very worth
while doing. Also, a shout out to the rangers. All the rangers that we had
guiding these tours were just so knowledgeable. They gave us really good
information on the history, the geography, the geology, the story of the people and
then how they weave into the the cave systems here. So yeah, big shout out to
the rangers. Super super thankful to them. One of the great things about Carlsbad Caverns is it’s underground. So for the most part it really doesn’t matter what
the weather is like up on the up on the surface. The scenic drive is one of those
few things that was impacted by that, but most of the the activities around here
it doesn’t matter whether it’s rain or shine outside. If you’re underground, it
doesn’t matter. Mm-hmm. The temperature inside of the camera stays at the fixed
temperature of 57 in Carlsbad Caverns. So if you go down there, bring a
light jacket. Yeah. Otherwise not much else is allowed. You can’t bring any
food or drinks because they don’t want to attract any animals that then fall
into the caves and then can’t get out. You only can bring plain water. So I think a big
tip from me is just really think about when you’re gonna come and visit here.
Carlsbad Caverns is a bit out of the way. A lot of people that we’ve spoken to have
combined it in a trip either with Big Bend National Park or the Guadalupe
Mountains National Park just down the road. I would suggest, if you are going to
think about coming here don’t necessarily come in summer.
We’ve come at the end of October and we’re here just outside the park.
It’s absolutely fantastic, a really nice weather.
Yeah, we had some rain, but otherwise it’s been nice blue skies and sunshine and
just a really pleasant experience. More importantly though, it’s much
quieter inside. We were speaking to the rangers and they said that in summer
they can get up to 3,000 people a day visiting the park. In the low season that
drops to 300 and whilst we’ve been here they said it was about 450 people a day.
It just gives you more chance of getting on those ranger-guided tours. You have a
quieter experience as you walk around and experience the cave to yourself. More
time to take photos. Loads more time, yeah. Just generally a really nice experience when it’s a bit quieter. So I would definitely consider coming in late
October. If you can, come just before the bat flights finish and see one of
those, because I think that’s what’s seeing. But don’t come in midsummer.
Or you could also come in spring when bats have returned and then the wildflowers are in bloom. There are no campgrounds inside the Carlsbad Caverns National Park. Though the parking lot does have an RV section, so you could stop by with your RV if
you’re on your way between places. We camped with our RV nearby at the Parks
Ranch Primitive Campground. It’s located on BLM land about 20 miles southwest of
Carlsbad. The road is really tough. In dry conditions it is deeply rutted so we were
thankful for the high clearance on our trailer.
There are several thorny bushes pretty close to the road, so we unfortunately
christened the trailer with its first desert pinstriping aka scratches. I’m sure
it won’t be the last time, but at least now it matches a truck. There are only a
handful of small sites at Parks Ranch and absolutely no amenities whatsoever. Our
trailer is only 25 feet from hitch to bumper and was still a very tight fit. If
you got something bigger then definitely think twice before you bring it down
here. It rained heavily one day during our
stay and sections of the road turn into a muddy pool of standing water about six
inches deep. We made it through and back several
times in our truck but we needed our four-wheel drive and even with off-road
tires it was more than a little slippery. Not desperately looking forward to towing the trailer out. I’m glad we stayed there long enough for
the road to dry up before we had to tow out the trailer. Whaw, the front door mat will be really wet. There are several
different caves in the area. The signs say that they are open to explore but
that you do so at your own risk. We met a family camping there who had toured the
caves before and they invited us to join them. So we did. It was great fun, but I’m
not sure we would been brave enough to explore them alone. It was quite fun!
Really good fun. It’s like canyoneering, but you have roof on your head.
Yeah! We enjoyed this
boondocking spot. It was quiet and peaceful. After six nights of boondocking
we stayed one night at the White’s City RV park near the entrance to Carlsbad
Caverns to dump, do laundry and charge our lithium batteries. From here, we drove to the Guadalupe Mountains National Park to boondock for another seven days. Since
we visited Carlsbad Caverns in November 2018, a new camping spot has opened up
few miles down the road which apparently is much better suited for big rigs. See
our blog post link below for all the details. This is Matt and I’m Diana and
we are on our Adventures Way to visit all the National Park Units in the United
States. So please subscribe and we’ll see you in the next episode. In the next
episode we’ll be in Guadalupe Mountains. Ouch, I forgot about that ballard was there. I missed that by an inch. Ouf, that was lucky! Do you need to flick your hair some more? Do you have any other adventurous tips?
I don’t know. Do I?

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