Daniel Lee’s Office with a View: Hospitality & Tourism Management

Daniel Lee’s Office with a View: Hospitality & Tourism Management


– My first few times, it
was a little daunting. I was scared to, like, look over the edge or even look down while
going on the staircase, but now it just feels
like I’m on ground level. I’ve done it so many times now that there’s nothing
that’s too scary about it. I’m the first hospitality
intern from Flagler to work at the lighthouse. This is definitely something that I’m very thankful to be able to do. ‘Cause as a student, I was completely unaware of what the workplace environment is, what it’s like to work from 8 to 5. The internship to me is the transition from student life into a true work life. I definitely am surprised every
day at what I am learning. I go out, I talk to everybody that I can, I talk to the BoatWorks people, and learn how to build wooden sailboats, and learn about archeological digs, and then just yesterday, I had a mandatory improv class that was used for story telling training, and so, like, little things like that that spice up the day and
really make it worthwhile. This is what I’ve always
wanted to do since I was six, and so I think about that a lot. I’ve known that I’ve always
wanted to work in attractions or resort management. I love Disney World, honestly. That is a place that I have
been to over 140 times. Part of that is because
I grew up in Orlando, and part of that is
because I love it so much. (children talking) This is the wrench that they use to, like, screw in the acorn brackets that keep the observation deck up. And then this is the oil room, so this is where all of the oil and kerosine would have been kept. They also used lard, yeah, ’cause usually lighthouses
they would have used whale oil, but this one was 1874, and so that was kinda
outlawed at that time, and so there were just
tons of pigs on the island, and so they used lard. – Seriously?! – Mm hmm. (children talking) Like, the lighthouse keeper
would have been carrying this up the entire way. So all of this is made
out of the same steel that was built in 1874. And so, it’s very reliable. Not a single, no deaths in
this lighthouse, ever, so. And I have actually been
inside of this lens, like I’ve been into the maintenance area and then stood inside of
it, next to the light. And so, like, it’s gigantic. And so we’re at 140 feet at the top of the lighthouse now. And so, you can see all of the island, you can see the ocean, of course, Conch Island, the Barrier Island. Why people really come to the lighthouse is to experience this, because this is definitely the highest point in St. Augustine. This is the place where my
parents took me when I was young, and so that’s very meaningful. But then it’s really fantastic that I get to be the person who’s up here, and talk to them, answer the questions, show them what they’re seeing, and then, you know, just be
a part of that experience. (upbeat piano music)

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