Duke Law School Video Tour

Duke Law School Video Tour


(upbeat music) – Welcome to Duke Law. Duke Law School is located right here on Duke University’s campus
in Durham, North Carolina. My name is Sudeep Paul and I’m
gonna be one of the students taking you on a tour of our law school. – And I’m Sophia Carter. Along the way, we’ll be
seeing students and faculty as well as visiting some
of the most important areas of the law school. Star Commons is the law school’s
largest gathering space. It’s used for studying,
socializing, and eating, as well as other important
events, such as speeches, panel discussions, and the
International Food Fiesta. On the first Friday of each month, a cocktail party hosted by
the Student Bar Association affords an opportunity for
students, faculty, and staff to interact with one another
in a more casual setting. – Here at Duke Law, you’re
gonna be working very hard but you’re also gonna
meet a lot of great people and make lifelong friends. – The J. Michael Goodson
Library, one of the central gathering spaces on campus,
becomes a home away from home for many law students. A technological and informational hub, students can access legal
databases, check out the 625,000 volumes available, explore
the rare book collection, and make use of the media
labs, group study rooms, and many of the other resources
that our library offers. The offices of our student
journals are housed primarily in the library. Second- and third-year
students write for and edit the journals and organize
conferences and symposia. The journals focus on areas of the law such as intellectual
property, constitutional law, environmental law, international
law, and gender law. Working on a journal is
an important way to engage with top legal minds from around the world and the journal offices are a
place where lifelong personal and professional bonds are formed. – One of the defining
characteristics of Duke Law School is its small student
body and its high ratio of professors to students. Classrooms are adjacent to faculty offices and so both the faculty and the students share the space alike. And in classrooms like this,
students can have lively discussions with their
professors and over time, develop close connections
with the faculty. – This is Duke’s Moot Courtroom. At the law school, you’ll
have a number of opportunities to improve your oral advocacy skills, including inter-scholastic mock trial, Moot Court competitions,
classroom advocacy, and courses such as Trial
Practice and Appellate Practice. – Duke Law School has a robust
international studies program that not only focuses
on giving U.S. students an opportunity to study
abroad, but also welcoming international students into our community. The law school offers more
than 21 exchange programs across the globe as well as
two international institutes based in Hong Kong and Geneva. These institutes are designed for students interested in studying
international and comparative law to take courses such as emerging markets, international trade,
international dispute resolution, human rights, and comparative
constitutional law. – The seasoned team in
Duke Law School’s Career and Professional Development
Center has backgrounds in law and business both in
the United States and abroad. Career counselors serve as
student advisers and coaches, helping students maximize
their law school experiences. With the four milestones
as guideposts to student development, academic excellence,
a network of advocates, a significant achievement
and experiential learning, the career center team
advises students on choices that weave together law school and life while also teaching students
fundamental skills for success in obtaining a position
and thriving in it. Duke students launch their
career on an upward trajectory and there’s no doubt that
Duke students work hard to achieve their goals,
with Duke’s career center and the entire community by their side. In addition to law firm
and government placement, Duke Law School emphasizes
the importance of judicial clerkships and has a staff
dedicated to matching students with clerkship opportunities. Here at Duke Law School,
we have an entire wing dedicated to the exclusive
use of our clinical program. Duke Law students can
sharpen their legal skills and gain practical experience
through involvement in any of our 10 clinics. The clinics offer an
opportunity to help people who otherwise couldn’t afford legal help and to delve into
specialized areas of the law that students want to explore. Working in the clinics is
one of the many real-world experiences that law students have to work in and around Durham. For example, students enrolled
in the Start-Up Ventures Clinic have an opportunity
to work in North Carolina’s research triangle, fertile
ground for entrepreneurship opportunities on the cutting edge of technology and business. The American Tobacco
campus is just one part of the thriving downtown
community in Durham, which is one of the fastest-growing
cities in the country. With a variety of restaurants
and plenty of things to see and do, it’s no wonder
that so many students choose to make this up and
coming city their home. Culture and nightlife are
also abundant in Durham, whether you’re interested
in visiting an exhibit at the Nasher museum,
checking out a local festival, or looking to unwind
with some close friends at the Federal, Fullsteam, or
any of Durham’s many cafes, coffee shops, and restaurants,
you’ll find opportunities for a vibrant social life in Durham. – And if you’re interested
in the great outdoors, you don’t have to go far. Eno River State Park, Duke
Forest, Jordan and Falls Lakes all offer beautiful scenery
and have areas to run, hike, camp, and mountain bike. They are all just a
short drive from campus. We hope you enjoyed your virtual tour. Visit us at law.duke.edu to
learn more about Duke Law. – If you’d like to visit
campus, just type in the search words visit duke law and find
out how to make an appointment with an admissions officer. We hope to see you soon.

5 thoughts on “Duke Law School Video Tour

  1. Nixon was a Duke law graduate and Duke's only presidential alum. Why isn't he mentioned in any campus tours?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *