Eyes for the Job: A tour of the workshop

Eyes for the Job: A tour of the workshop


An AMI-tv digital exclusive. Hey it’s Chris Judge here from Eyes for
the Job! Welcome back to the community workshop! We spend a lot of time here, building things
and making a big mess. We have about 800 square feet of workspace,
it’s a rectangle shaped room. We’ve got eight main work stations around
the workshop and we can accommodate 6-8 people at any one time working together comfortably. It’s a great space, fully accessible, and
everybody’s welcome. *Click of switch, machine starting* *Speaking loudly over the noise* You hear
that?! That’s the sound of the bandsaw! It’s a big blade that’s the shape of a
band on a wheel that’s above and a wheel that’s below it. We do a lot of our fine work here. A lot of
circles, a lot of angles. You know, anything that has a curve. A lot of finishing things. OK, from the band saw, follow me over to
mitre saw, which is against the wall here. Most of our projects start here the rough
cutting gets done here. A lot of our projects start with long pieces
of material, 2x4s and what have you. We need a nice, long, solid table to set them
on to do our rough cut. And we got our raw materials above. So it’s just a matter of reaching up and
grabbing a board, putting it on the mitre saw table, and doing your chop. This is a stationary tool, which means that
the tool itself is not going to move, it’s the material that you manipulate. Moving on from chops to rips, over here in
the middle of the workshop, the star of the show, the table saw. Like it’s name implies, it’s a table.
It sits on the floor on its own stand. It has a fence. The blade sticks up though the top of the
table. It’s a circular blade. This saw is used for heavier pieces of wood.
We do our rips here, as I said before. So a piece of plywood that needs to be ripped, say from 4 feet to 2 feet, we’d run it across
the table, through the blade and against the fence to keep it straight. And you’d have
your rip. From spinning blades to spinning bits, two
of the workstations that move all around the workshop as we need them: the router table and the drill press. The
router table is a table with a router mounted underneath. We make dados and rebates and other things
using the router. And to slow things down a bit, let’s move
over to the right, to our drill press. Now the drill press is a table top tool. I
say slow things down a bit because this is a variable speed tool. You can adjust it to drill anywhere from a
modest 500 RPM up to 3000, depending on whether you are drilling metal or wood. Speaking of spinning and turning, my favourite
thing to do: wood turning right here at the lathe. The lathe is a stationary tool. And I’m
glad it is, because it is one heavy beast. You can turn anything from baseball bats to
pens on this thing. So, as you can see, we have tools to do almost
any project. We have lots of space to work in. I’d like to thank you all for coming in
today, and I’d like to invite you back anytime. If you want to learn more about some of the
tools that I use for DIYing, check out more videos at AMI.ca. Eyes for the Job, Season three, premieres Tuesday, September 10, at 8 p.m. Eastern on AMI-tv.

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