Figure Out English Podcast 24 Phrasal Verbs: TRAVEL

Figure Out English Podcast 24 Phrasal Verbs: TRAVEL


Hello, and we are here again for a new
episode of the ‘Figure out English’ podcast for English learners. The
transcript will be available as usual on figureoutenglish.com as well as the
learning notes and practice exercises. And let’s start! Welcome everybody to
our podcast ‘Figure Out English’, and today we are talking about traveling again
because I would like to help you with your phrasal verbs. It’s very easy to
understand: when we communicate in our everyday reality, it is non-formal
context. You probably know this difference between formal and informal,
at least, you need to know that because if you talk to your boss at your job, for
example, or write some letters or create some documents (yeah) – this is the formal
style and it’s often written style. This is what we write, and we usually write in
longer sentences and in longer words. But everyday communication, speaking, is
usually informal and that’s why in informal communication, we have to use
phrasal verbs. It’s not bad words, they don’t spoil your language as long as you
can switch between the styles easily. But if you start speaking in this long words
in everyday context, it will be again unnatural because you probably know: native
speakers use a lot of empty verbs like ‘get’, like ‘go’ (yeah). There are a lot of
set phrases and they also use a lot of phrasal verbs. And I would like to teach
you a list of phrasal verbs concerned with TRAVEL. You can use this verbs if
you write or tell your friends about your travels, if you have some
communication during your trip. (ok) Let’s start. First of all, when you start your
travel, you say ‘set off’: e.g. What time are we setting off tomorrow? It means ‘what time
we we’ll leave home’ (yeah). E.g. What time are we
setting off tomorrow? And then, for example, you take a taxi and
you go to the airport to travel to some destination. When you ‘get into’ the
airport (yeah) – we ‘get into’ the place, it means we enter the place, you search for
your plane and then you board the plane but you can actually say ‘get on’ the
plane: E.g. ‘We are getting on the plane in five minutes – hurry up!’ We are ‘getting on’
the plane. Then, when you leave the plane, you will say: We are ‘getting off’ the
plane. Well, we have this long word debarkment (BETTER ‘debarkation’) here, so we ‘debark’ the plane
but this is quite long. They normally say: We are ;getting off; the plane. And then
you arrive in your destination (yeah), you arrive in the city, you arrive in some
small place and you come to the hotel. And in the hotel, you… well, I’m sure you
know that, everybody knows that, yeah … you ‘check in’: e.g What time should we
check in (okay) in the hotel? What time is our check-in? – you can say, for example, and
then later, when you will be leaving the hotel, you will say: We are ‘checking
out’ at ten o clock tomorrow. If you just stayed in this hotel for one night: What
time are we checking out? or What time is our checkout tomorrow? You can form an
noun from here. And by the way, please pay attention to
this vocabulary. I hear this small mistake about the verb
‘stay’ versus ‘leav’e from many of my students. They often say: ‘Well, we live in
Ramada Inn’, for example, but ‘live’ means to live, to reside for a
long time, constantly, you can say. When you are on holiday and it’s just a
couple of days or a couple of weeks or even a couple of months, if it’s such a
long holiday, you should always use ‘stay’. E.g. ‘Where are you staying?’, ‘What hotel are you staying in?’, ‘We are staying in Ramada Inn’, for example.
or ‘I hate staying in the hotels! We always stay in the campsites in our
travels’. Okay? And let’s continue with the … because I have a couple of good
phrasal words for you. If you take a flight and you ‘change planes’ (‘change
planes’ – you will not say ‘to change a plane’). For example, yes, first you go to
Brussels, then you change planes in Brussels and then you are going to Cuba,
for example. If you spend the night in Brussels on your way to Cuba, it will be
called a ‘stopover’. E.g. ‘I am stopping over in Brussels on my way to Cuba’. ‘On my way’ – it
is also a very good phrase. I have a video on YouTube, please watch it because
you can use it (=this phrase) in everyday context very easily. Ok, so, ‘I am stopping over in
Brussels on my way to Cuba’. And two more really good phrasal verbs. We say ‘pick up
somebody’ meaning ‘come to this place and take this person from
this place’, for example. So, ‘the taxi is picking us up here’. (yeah) For example, ‘this
is the place we should be because the taxi will come for us here, the taxi is
picking us up here’. Or for example, ‘what time does the taxi need to pick us up?
(yeah) I mean ‘what time should we go to the airport? What time should the taxi
pick us up?’ And the opposite of this phrasal verb will be ‘drop off’. E.g. ‘Please
drop me off here’ – it means ‘I will leave the car here’. ‘Drop me off here’, ‘I will
just drop you off at the parking lot’ (yeah)=
I will take you to the parking lot and then you will get out of the car. I hope
it helps and this is actually a very good method for your phrasal verbs: to
learn them in topical groups. I am strongly against learning the phrasal
verbs in list and especially in alphabetical lists. If they are out of
the context, you will not know what to do with them but if you group them around
some certain topic this will be very useful because you will be imagining the
real situations in your mind – this is also a good learning technique – and this
will help you to remember them better. I hope it helps. Please let me know if you
would like to learn the phrasal verbs of some other… about some other topics and
happy travels! Thanks for listening please visit figureoutenglish.com for
a free download of the transcript and learning notes. Don’t forget to share and
comment! Cheers!

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