Karnataka – Historical Tourist Destination of India ||Episode 4||

Karnataka – Historical Tourist Destination of India ||Episode 4||


Karnataka is a state in the south western
region of India. It was formed on 1 November 1956, with the passage of the States Reorganisation
Act. Originally known as the State of Mysore, it was renamed Karnataka in 1973. With an
antiquity that dates to the paleolithic, Karnataka has been home to some of the most
powerful empires of ancient and medieval India. There is an array of ancient sculptured temples, modern cities, scenic hill ranges, forests and beaches.
Welcome to my channel friends. In this Amazing India journey, today we will explore some
of the most exotic and ancient historical tourist places in the State of Karnataka. Hampi, the state of ruins, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Situated in the shadowed depth of hills and valleys in the state of Karnataka,
this place is a historical delight for travellers. Surrounded by 500 ancient monuments, beautiful
temples, bustling street markets, bastions, treasury building and captivating remains
of Vijayanagar Empire, Hampi is a backpacker’s delight. Hampi is an open museum with 100+
locations to explore and a favourite way to see the city from the perspective of its history. Hampi  is located on the banks of the Tungabhadra
River. Famous for its massive, beautifully carved temples, especially the Virupaksha
Temple. The temple is dedicated to Lord Virupaksha, a form of Shiva. The temple was built by Lakkan
Dandesha, a nayaka (chieftain) under the ruler Deva Raya II. The temple’s history is uninterrupted
from about the 7th century. The Virupaksha-Pampa sanctuary existed well before the Vijayanagara
capital was located here. Inscriptions referring to Shiva date back to the 9th and 10th centuries.
What started as a small shrine grew into a large complex under the Vijayanagara rulers.
Evidence indicates there were additions made to the temple in the late Chalukyan and Hoysala
periods, though most of the temple buildings are attributed to the Vijayanagar period. The Badami cave temples are a complex of Hindu and Jain cave
temples located in Badami, a town in the Bagalkot district in northern part of Karnataka,
India. The caves are considered an example of Indian rock-cut architecture, especially Badami
Chalukya architecture, which dates from the 6th century. Badami was previously known as
Vataapi Badami, the capital of the early Chalukya dynasty, which ruled much of Karnataka from
the 6th to the 8th century. Badami is situated on the west bank of a man-made lake ringed
by an earthen wall with stone steps; it is surrounded on the north and south by forts
built in later times. The Badami cave temples represent some of
the earliest known examples of Hindu temples in the Deccan region. They transformed the Malaprabha
River valley into a cradle of temple architecture that influenced the components of later Hindu
temples elsewhere in India. In Cave 1, among various sculptures of Hindu
divinities and themes, a prominent carving is of the Tandava-dancing Shiva as Nataraja.
Cave 2 is mostly similar to Cave 1 in terms of its layout and dimensions, featuring Hindu
subjects of which the relief of Vishnu as Trivikrama is the largest. The largest cave is Cave 3, featuring
Vishnu-related mythology, and it is also the most intricately carved cave in the complex.
Cave 4 is dedicated to revered figures of Jainism. Aihole, also referred to as Aivalli, or Aryapura,
is a historic site of ancient and medieval era Buddhist, Hindu and Jain monuments
in north Karnataka, dated from the sixth century through the twelfth century AD, though
the most of the surviving monuments date from the 7th to 10th centuries. Located around
a small village surrounded by farmlands and sandstone hills, Aihole is a major archaeological
site featuring over one hundred and twenty stone and cave temples from this period, spread
along the Malaprabha river valley, in Bagalakote district. Aihole is 35 km from Badami and about 10 km
from Pattadakal, both of which are major centres of historically important Chalukya
monuments. Aihole, along with nearby Badami, emerged by the 6th century as the cradle of
experimentation with temple architecture, stone artwork, and construction techniques.
This resulted in 16 types of free-standing temples and 4 types of rock-cut shrines. The
experimentation in architecture and arts that began in Aihole yielded the group of monuments
at Pattadakal, a UNESCO world heritage site. Over one hundred Aihole temples are Hindu,
a few are Jain and one is Buddhist. These were built and coexisted in close proximity.
The site is spread over about 5 square kilometres. The Hindu temples are dedicated to Shiva, Vishnu, Durga, Surya and
other Hindu deities. The Jain temples are dedicated to Mahavira, Parshvanatha, Neminatha and
other Jain Tirthankaras. Pattadakal (“place of coronation”) was considered
a holy place, being where the Malprabha river turned northwards towards the Himalayas and
the Kailasha mountain. As its name implies, it was used during the Chalukya dynasty for
coronation ceremonies. Pattadakal, also called Raktapura, is a complex of 7th and 8th century
AD Hindu and Jain temples in northern Karnataka. Located on the west bank of the Malaprabha
River in Bagalakote district, this UNESCO World Heritage site is 23 km from Badami and
about 10 km from Aihole, both of which are historically significant centres of Chalukya
monuments. UNESCO has described Pattadakal as “a harmonious
blend of architectural forms from northern and southern India” and an illustration of
“eclectic art” at its height. The Hindu temples are generally dedicated to Shiva, but elements
of Vaishnavism and Shaktism theology and legends are also featured. Hindu temples display
various Vedic and Puranic concepts, stories from the Ramayana, the Mahabharata, the Bhagavata
Purana, as well as elements of other Hindu texts, such as the Panchatantra. Hoysaleswara temple, also referred simply
as the Halebidu temple, is a 12th-century Hindu temple dedicated to Shiva. It is the
largest monument in Halebidu, a town in the state of Karnataka, India and the former capital
of the Hoysala Empire. The temple was built on the banks of a large man-made lake, and
sponsored by King Vishnuvardhana of the Hoysala Empire. Its construction started around 1121
AD and was complete in 1160 AD. It is 30 kilometres from Hassan city and about 210 kilometres
from Bengaluru, about 4 hours drive accessible with a four lane NH75 highway through Hassan. The Hoysaleswara temple is a Shaivism tradition
monument, yet reverentially includes many themes from Vaishnavism and Shaktism tradition
of Hinduism, as well as images from Jainism. The Hoysaleswara temple is a twin-temple dedicated
to Hoysaleswara and Santaleswara Shiva lingas, named after the masculine and feminine aspects,
both equal and joined at their transept. The temple includes a smaller sanctum for the
Hindu Sun god Surya. The temple was carved from soapstone. It is notable for its sculptures,
intricate reliefs, detailed friezes as well its history, iconography, inscriptions in
North and South Indian scripts. The temple artwork provides a pictorial window into the
life and culture of the 12th century India. About 340 large reliefs depict the Hindu theology
and associated legends. Numerous smaller friezes narrate Hindu texts such as the Ramayana,
the Mahabharata and the Bhagavata Purana.

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