Nigella Lawson – Forever Summer – 5

Nigella Lawson – Forever Summer – 5


For us Northern Europeans, starved
of sun for so much of the year, red brings warmth and oomph –
it revs us up. I just have to taste the bright,
acid sweetness of raspberries and I’m there, in an August heatwave. And I love, I need, the hottest
red of all, the blaze of chilli. It lights up the kitchen and it brings food – whatever
the weather – to incendiary life. Chillies are crucial
in spare ribs, I think, ’cause although I love all that
familiar, resonant stickiness, what I don’t want is jamminess. So, I need fire and heat. And chillies really provide that. And freshness as well,
which is important. Chillies. Mmm! With ginger and spring onions. And the spare ribs themselves. You can get these, you know,
in the supermarket these days. But if not, ask a butcher. OK, so, we’re ready for the off. Now, first, some rice wine vinegar – for sourness,
because all barbecue has to have a sour element as well as a sweet. About four tablespoons,
which is 60ml. That’s about it. Slightly less soy,
about three tablespoonfuls. Yum. Some toasted sesame oil. Not a lot, just enough to give
that aromatic nuttiness. And now ordinary oil – groundnut or
vegetable – about two tablespoonfuls. OK, the same amount of honey. About two tablespoonfuls worth. Runny honey,
not that thick, solid stuff. Mmm. Now, staying with sweetness,
I want cinnamon. And I like to crumble it in,
like this, not use ground cinnamon. In the same note,
some star-anise, a couple. Throw them in. And now ginger, quite a bit of it. Just tumble in these golden spikes. Four spring onions,
just roughly chopped. Now the chillies –
two lovely, fat, red, juicy ones. Tumble these in. And in these ribs go.
I’ve got 16 here. But… I don’t know how many people
you’re going to be cooking for. And really move everything about so that the marinade
thinly coats the ribs all over. I’m going to get
the roasting tin out now, so I can just…leave them in here… ..marinading, while I clear up. And then they can just
go in the oven. Right, well, these have had as much as I’m going to give them
in the marinade. So, I’m just gonna tip them
into the tin. Really make sure to squeeze
every last bit of marinade, and all these lovely
fresh, chunky bits of taste. Smoosh them about
so everything’s still covered. And the ribs need to be cooked
partly covered and then for a while uncovered. So, just stick some foil on them now
and get them into a hot oven, number 6 – 200. Start the process off. About an hour for this bit. I make my ribs a bit fierier
than a lot of people would, but then I love hot food. I mean, I think it’s compulsive. And, in fact,
I once did read a paper which explained that
there’s something in chillies which makes them
chemically addictive. And I have to admit,
I am a complete heat junkie. The food I like eating most
is the food that bites back. I mean, so pitiful, I have to say,
is my addiction to chilli, that just in case I’m out of my home
without a sauce of heat, I carry these little baby bottles
of Tabasco in my bag and then I know I’m gonna be OK. I mean, it’s that bad. But I have quite an array of chilli
sauces from around the world, all of which
are deeply necessary to me. Peperoncini. This is very old, you can see. These are little,
dried, red chilli peppers. Well, they’ve lost their redness but,
boy, they have not lost their heat. And they can really give depth
to the simplest pasta supper. Just fry some slivered garlic
and one to two crumbled chillies and stir through
some hot, drained spaghetti. Serve with a sprinkling
of fresh parsley. Spaghetti aglio, olio. Simple, sensational and life-giving. Sambal oelek. I love this. It’s very hot chilli
from Indonesia. Really, this is just
salted, pounded chillies, so you get all the texture
and all the heat. It’s my secret
for instantly transforming a comforting roast chicken to a fire-giving, chilli-hot dinner. Just smear the skin with sambal oelek and roast in an oven
at maximum temperature. Addictive! Sweet chilli dipping sauce
from China. Now, sweetness and heat
go very well together. OK, this is a strange combination,
but I beg you to try it – ice-cream with red-hot chilli syrup, made by boiling a cupful each
of water and sugar, then pouring it over
a finely chopped chilli. Take my word for it, it really works. Feel lit up and soothed
at the same time. Well, those ribs should have
had about an hour. Let’s unveil them. Now, they look a bit pale
and that’s because, at this stage, I’m going to put on some honey
and some five-spice powder and then turn up the heat
so that they get sticky and glazed. About two generous…tablespoonfuls
worth of honey. Mmm. And about two teaspoons
of five-spice powder. And then, in this really hot oven,
which is about gas 8 – 230 Centigrade – they will need about 30 minutes
more, but you have to watch. Just turn them occasionally
so that they get really sticky and sort of thick with glaze. And what I love to do at the end, is add a final sprinkle
of earthy, hot coriander and really deep heat
with some more fresh red chillies. Perfect. And you can see these ribs
are scorched and glazed. Right. Tong away. Oh, I love all that sort of conker,
shiny, resonant stickiness. Just pile them up
on top of one another because they go down very quickly. Now a final red and green sprinkling
of the coriander and chilli. Mmm! And this one is mine now. Mmm! Mmm! (TYPES) As a food writer,
but really as an eater, I am a shameless solicitor
for recipes. I want everyone I meet to tell me
what they cook and how they cook it. But I think cooking is where
social history and gossip meet. And it’s about sharing and passing on of habits and practices. One of my favourite recipes
was sent to me by a friend who was travelling around Australia, and she emailed me this thing called slut-red raspberries
in chardonnay jelly. And I knew I wanted to make it
’cause it sounded so terrific. But I thought no recipe
could live up to that title. Luckily, I was wrong,
because I think this surpasses it. These raspberries, about 300 grams, have been steeped in
a bottle of chardonnay. And you can begin to see why these
are called ‘slut-red raspberries’, because the thing about the wine
is that as the berries steep in it, they take on almost like a sort
of stained-glass quality, lucent. And it’s not just that. It’s also that their sort of very
raspberriness is enhanced as well. I mean, they’re so fabulous, and their fruitiness
goes into the floral wine, and it just tastes,
when you eat it, like, I don’t know, essence of summer. OK, just shove that there. And a vanilla pod goes into this, that old-fashioned,
nursery scent of vanilla just permeates through the liquid. Just split it lengthways. Stick it into the wine and just turn on the heat,
let it come to a boil and then just leave off the heat
for 15 minutes so that all those wonderful,
fruity, floral and spicy flavours just merge into one another. So, while this is going on, I’m going to fill up these little
glass bowls with the berries. And you could use one large bowl. It’s just that you get that perfect soft-set quality
with the jelly better when you have a small container. Now I’m going to pour some
cold water in here, for a purpose. And that purpose is that I want to
soften my gelatine in the cold water before dissolving it
into the hot wine. I don’t know if you’ve
come across this before. This is leaf gelatine, which comes in kind of rigid,
see-through, hard strips, a bit like sort of plastic cardboard. I’m only using five leaves
’cause I want a lovely soft set, so that when you dip your spoon
into the jelly, you get that really voluptuous, soft,
cool, wibble-wobble on the spoon. That just needs a few minutes to soften and jellify
in the cold water before being dissolved
in this lovely warm wine, which needs to be sweetened. About 250 grams of caster sugar, which dissolves better
than granulated. And turn the heat back on gently,
just to help the sugar dissolve. I’m going to remove the pod, but don’t throw it away,
never be wasteful. Just let it dry and just stick it
in a bag of caster sugar, and you’ve got vanilla sugar. Right, so the gelatine is ready
to be dissolved in the wine. It’s easier to dissolve it first
in a smaller amount, so I take out a third… Yeah… Or thereabouts. I use the term loosely. And now squidge and squelch. Look at this. Mmm! And just drop it into the jug
and whisk to dissolve. That’s it. Pour back in here
so you’ve got the whole lot. Now, because there is more than
a touch of Norman Wisdom about me, I’m going to pour this
into a jug first, ’cause I think if I start trying
to fill up those little bowls
from a pan, it’ll go all over the tray. And just…pour this wonderful, scented, floral wine over the berries. Just go into the fridge, I don’t
know, for five hours or so to set. I always think
it’s a good idea, though, to take them out a good 40 minutes
before you want to eat them, because you want this
as soft and melting as possible. I mean, these are lovely
just as they are, but what I particularly adore is after you’ve taken
that first soft spoonful, just fill out that dip
with some double cream and just let it swirl over. I mean, old-fashioned perfection –
jellies and cream.(BRIGHT JAZZ MUSIC)In cooking, as in the rest of life, I believe in playing to my strengths,
not my weaknesses. And I am unapologetically
an enthusiast, not an expert, which is my way of saying,
however awful this sounds, that I leave any job that requires patience, dexterity
or even brisk competence, to others.(LIVELY JAZZ MUSIC)I don’t wish to state the obvious –
and, yes, fishmongers do sell fish – but the point for me is that they will do
all the fiddly jobs that I can’t do. I mean, I’m not just buying
their produce – you know, fabulous though it is. I’m buying their expertise. Because, you know, in cooking, you just have to stack the odds
in your favour. So, if someone else is gonna do
all the hard work for you, well, frankly you’re just taking
the stress out of the kitchen. Look, I do understand that the idea
of making a crab sauce for pasta sounds incredibly involved,
not to say fancy. But you’re just gonna
have to believe me when I say that it’s about as simple as making a spaghetti
with tomato sauce, like you might do every day
for the kids for tea. Look at my lovely crab. Now, culinary weapon
of choice here. (GRUNTS) If I can lift it down. My pestle and mortar. Well, this takes no time,
so I’m gonna get the water on now. It should anyway be boiled
from the kettle. Huge pan. Always makes it better with pasta
to use as much water as you can, not least because the temperature
won’t sink as much when you add the pasta. Right, time for a bit of
upper-body workout, so I’m gonna get rid of this. Garlic first. I mean, this pasta
sauce needs to be very garlicky. Just peel them. OK. Now, a bit of salt.
About a tablespoonful. I mean, this sort of amount,
small handful. And I’m just going to pulverise
the garlic to a wonderfully sort of
dense, sticky puree. Right, so, I’ve got the wonderful sort of deep heat of the garlic. And now I want the fine spikiness of some red chilli in the… I never know whether this is
the pestle or this is the mortar. I’m presuming that this is the mortar
and this is the pestle. Don’t write in. OK, in they go, and these wonderful
sort of clumps of red are going to be pounded
to a sort of coral sunset paste. I must say, I do like
any form of kitchen activity which sort of demands work
that doesn’t need any dexterity, and this about sums it up. Now get the pasta in. I use linguini,
which I suppose, in a way, is like a cross between
spaghetti and tagliatelli. Slightly wider
but also wonderfully dense, which makes it a great vehicle
to carry the sauce. Now, the main event. This is about 100 grams
of brown crab meat. And about twice that,
so 200, of white. OK, just fork through. And now some olive oil,
about 125 millilitres. I find that easiest to use
an American half-cup measure. Mmm. Right, lemon. A lot of zest as well as juice, just because I want this to be
really quite definitely lemony. I mean, not astringent,
it’s all got to work together. OK, so, that’s my zest. Right, now, just the juice. Beautiful colours. So, just fork it through –
and that is all there is to it. Just gonna go and check
how the pasta’s doing. Looks like it needs
another couple of minutes or so, which gives me time
to do my bits and pieces. I’m gonna chop some herbs. Now, I have to say you don’t need to
use this crab as a sauce for pasta. It is really wonderful
just heaped on a plate and eaten with a pile
of hot, hot brown toast. But then again,
having recently released myself from a low-carbohydrate diet, I find that I can leave
no loaf unturned. And any bread is really
wonderful with this. I’m just going to have
a quick…rhapsodic dip. Mmm. Mmm! And… That looks absolutely perfect. Just need to…turn the heat off and drain and dress. And now, this is the bit
you need to be strong for. (GRUNTS) Not as much sauce, maybe, as you’d
think for this amount of pasta. But then, I want this to be
kind of lightly dressed in it, rather than drenched. Oh, that’s it. A quick swirl around. Mmm! So lovely. Right, watercress and parsley. Scarcely wilt in the heat really. Mmm! So beautiful when it’s
flecked with the green too. Mmm! Right. I can’t wait. Mmm. Perfect. Right, I’m going into the garden for a spot of alfresco cooking
this afternoon. Please…come with me. OK, ready to barbie. Now, these fish fillets will take hardly any time to cook. I’m gonna put some foil
on the barbecue, ’cause otherwise I find the fish
just sticks to the wires, and I don’t want to mar
the beauteousness of my fillets. Slap ’em down.(SIZZLING)
Mmm.And as quick as these are, I mean
the shredded salad is even quicker. I mean, one, because,
of course, there’s no cooking. And, two, because I’ve already
chopped everything up. First…carrot. Some spring onions. Lovely. Hot, red chilli pepper,
although not as hot as it could be ’cause I’ve taken the seeds out, so you get the heat
but intense sweetness. And some green pawpaw, which looks a bit like cucumber
but is much crunchier and nuttier. And now some really lovely, pink,
raw peanuts, lovely and sweet. And really earthy, pungent coriander. So, these just need to be
roughly chopped. OK, so…I’m just gonna… ..add these, and then attempt,
in my rather alarmingly clumsy way, to turn over the fish. Be patient with me. It’s just very difficult
not to tear this lovely skin. Here goes again. You don’t need to use red mullet, beautiful though these are,
as you can see. Salmon fillets are fabulous too,
a lovely coral. But chicken, anything you want. I mean, please. OK, now…we’ve got
all that lovely crunchy sweetness. So, we need a bit of sharpness
to offset that. Lime, very sour. Just one. But squeeze out well. Mmm. Some fish sauce. And it’s this sharp note which makes
the whole thing so refreshing and, if I may say so,
very un-fishily inviting. A bit of sugar to melt into the
sourness of the fish sauce and lime. You need that. Balance is everything,
in life, in food. Stir. And we’re done. Now I’m going to fight with my…inner clumsy self – and outer, I have to say – and get these lovely pink babies
off the grill. And just strew…with those
lovely crunchy shards. Mmm! Glass of cold beer and this fish.
Mmm! Supertext Captions by Ericsson
Captions (c) SBS Australia 2015

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