RoadTripOK: Ep. 9 Park Hill – Tahlequah | Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department | OTRD

RoadTripOK: Ep. 9 Park Hill – Tahlequah | Oklahoma Tourism and Recreation Department | OTRD


(upbeat music) – [Narrator] Our state is
one of the most beautiful and unique states in the USA. (bird wings flutter) (music intensifies) With diverse geographies, the Historic Route 66, unforgettable restaurants, and some of the greatest
people on the planet. We want to show you why traveling within the great state of
Oklahoma is a great idea. So come join us for thousands
of miles over the next year. From Broken Bow, to Black Mesa. This is the Oklahoma Road Trip. (upbeat music) From Lake Tenkiller, we
head north toward Tahlequah, until we reached our
first stop of the day, the Cherokee Heritage Center. Alright, I’m here with Becky at the Cherokee Heritage Center and we are walking around one
of the coolest areas here. Becky, tell me a little
bit about where we are. – We are here in Park Hill, Oklahoma, historic Park Hill, Oklahoma, at the Cherokee Heritage
Center Museum and Diligwa. This is our 1710 rendition
of a Cherokee village. We have villagers
reenacting Cherokee crafts. We have huts and structures
that were very similar to the 1710s. So this is just where we reenact and let people experience Cherokee. Back in the ’60s we had a
gentleman by the name of Marty Hagerstrand, his wife was Cherokee. – Okay. – And he kind of wanted to
do an homage to her heritage. – Wow. – So that’s why he started the Cherokee National Historical Society. So just in a span of about
10 years he made this complex and just a place where
people from around the world can come to kind of experience Cherokee. – When they come and see somebody like me, I may be one of the only Native Americans they ever see in their life. So people come and they’ll
take my tour and we’ll laugh, we’ll have a good time and it’s just fun to be there for them. – [Becky] Once you walk in,
you just are really entranced into a different time period. (dramatic music) – [Tonia] The Cherokee Heritage Center has been open for 50 years and we have hosted
millions of people here. The story of the Cherokee
people and the Trail of Tears is a long story that
culminates here in Tahlequah. The bead wall, which circles
the length of the gallery, shows 16,000 handmade beads. The white beads represent
those who survived the removal, the red beads are those
who are missing or lost, and the black beads represent
the 2,000 people confirmed that we know died. The most vital thing, for me, here, is the spirit of Cherokee people. We are happy to host many,
many school children, lots of school groups that
come and educate their children about the Cherokee people
through our museum, to continue to perpetuate
our beautiful culture. (upbeat music) – [Narrator] After spending time at the Cherokee Heritage Center, we drove north into Tahlequah, pulling over for a quick
bite to eat at our next stop, Linney Breaux’s Cajun Eatery. – We wanted to portray something
that you would walk in to South Louisiana.
– [Michael] Yeah. – [Brandon] But we were
both raised in Lafayette, the culture, the decor, everything that you see in here
is something that you’d see in Lafayette, where we grew up at. – That’s something about
the Louisiana culture is the friendliness, you know, just the atmosphere in places,
it always feels like family, you know-
– Yeah. – when you’re going in. And so, yeah, we just wanted
to create that excitement here. – So tell me, why do people come here? Like what are the things
that people get stoked about when they come and sit down and eat here. – Boudin Ballz.
– Boudin! The Boudin Ballz, baby! – Traditional Boudin, it’s got chicken, pork, rice, onions, peppers. You put it into a sausage casing. – [Narrator] Yeah. – But we actually take the mix, roll it into a meatball, hand-bread it, fry it, and you can also stuff it
with Pepper Jack cheese. – Shout out to Billy’s Boudin. – Yeah, Billy’s Boudin, some
of the originators of this. We can’t produce enough of them. I mean, we’re selling out week after week. (yells) – [Michael] What’s up? Welcome, welcome. We got a little smorgasbord for ya. – [Lacy] Oh my god. – Some sick Cajun eats. We’ve got some shrimp and
grits right here for ya, cheese grits. – [Brandon] Shrimp Po-Boy. We got a seafood dinner combo. – [Man] I can take that one. – [Michael] Smothered Cat-Daddy
with crawfish etouffee, our Dirty Berty. – [Brandon And Michael]
And last but not least… – Ooh. – [Brandon] Gold Rum Sauce Bread Pudding. – [Man] The appetizer. – [Lacy] Oh my god. – Not the dessert, the appetizer. – [Brandon] Oh it’s
definitely the appetizer. – [Michael] Yeah! Yep, yep, yep. – Awesome. – [Brandon] There you go, enjoy. – [Michael] Hope you can handle it. – Oh we can handle it.
– I’m excited. – [Michael] Laissez les bon temps rouler! Let those good times roll! – [Lacy And Man] All right! – Let’s start with this catfish etouffee. I’m gonna reach over you. (bird caws) – Dude, this shrimp is real. I don’t really want talk about it too much because I don’t want you
guys to reach over here. – Yeah, no, I’m gonna reach
over there no matter what, so you might as well say something. – Whoo! Well, we just got done
eating at Linney Breaux’s, it was delicious, we are very full, and now we are gonna go float the river. Let’s go. (upbeat music) – [Narrator] From Linney
Breaux’s in south Tahlequah, we head north on Highway 62 until we reach the Illinois River. There we made our final stop of the day at All American Floats. All right, we are at All American Floats, just outside of Tahlequah, down the Illinois River. So I’m here to talk with
Carson and Peyton a little bit. So, first of all, tell me, you
know, a little of the history behind this endeavor. Who started this, and why? – So, my parents, 16 years ago, were from Cherokee, North Carolina. They started a tubing business out there, and we’ve done it. And then my dad discovered
this place three years ago and decided that he
wanted to take over it, so we built this basically
from the ground up, and started this operation. So we run both here in
Tahlequah and in Cherokee. – [Peyton] So we have
a 4-mile and a 9-mile, and also a 14-mile. – [Narrator] And what would
you say is something unique or rare about the Illinois
River that is worth coming out and hunting down? – [Peyton] Just the view
and it’s quiet out there, but just to have fun and be
with people that you care about. – What’s up, Oklahoma? We’re out here on the Illinois River. I’m about to cool off
from this hot summer sun, and take a little splash into the water. (water bubbles) (upbeat music) (yells) All right, we’re finished
up with our afternoon of canoeing and kayaking here
on the Illinois River. If you’ve never been out
here, we highly recommend it. So, if you’re putting
your road trip together, consider the Tahlequah area. The Cherokee Heritage
Center, Linney Breaux’s, and maybe come out and
do like Lacy and cruise on the Illinois. (camera clicks) (yells) (upbeat music) On today’s road trip, we
experienced some of the history, as well as some of the fun
and excitement that the Park Hill and Tahlequah
area have to offer. First, we visited the
Cherokee Heritage Center. Visitors from around the
country come to experience the live reenactments, view
the authentic native artifacts, and admire the variety of modern art inspired by the Cherokee story. Next we stopped at Linney
Breaux’s Cajun Eatery where Brandon and Michael
met us with open arms. We loved the variety of Cajun flavors, as well as the original sauces, and of course, the Boudin Ballz. Finally, we took a ride down the river at All American Floats. The Illinois River was beautiful, and we definitely recommend
it for individuals and families as well. Visitors can enjoy a variety of different boating experiences at All American Floats, or
at one of the many other boating outfitters located
along the Illinois River. Join us next time on
the Oklahoma Road Trip where we’ll head west towards Muskogee. First, we’ll take you fishing
at Greenleaf State Park. Then, we’ll have lunch at Station One. And finally, we’ll take you
on an off-roading adventure. We’ll see you then.

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