Rustic Camping in Massachusetts | English Lesson (Intermediate)

Rustic Camping in Massachusetts | English Lesson (Intermediate)


Victor Hart is the Founder of the Natural Language
Institute, and the first teacher of the Natural English
course. In this video, from July 2018, he is camping on top of Mt.
Greylock, the tallest mountain in Massachusetts, which overlooks
Williams College, where Victor went to college. In the last video, Victor is seen with his daughter, Camila. Hi, I’m Victor Hart, your Natural English teacher. This is an intermediate level video about camping and being
outdoors. We are on top of Mt. Greylock in northwest Massachusetts,
United States, near Williams College, which is where I went to college many
years ago. Now, I’m going to make breakfast—a late breakfast—in a
little bit, and I’m using wood-burning camping stoves, so I need to gather wood and other things to burn to make
breakfast. Basically, I’m going to gather twigs. Twigs are small
sticks. So, this is a stick, right? And this is a twig, because it’s
a small stick. So, I’m going to gather twigs and also pine cones. These are small pine cones, but they’re very good for my
wood-burning stove that boils water. You can also cook things on it. But I have two—I have a
small one, I’ll show you, and a big one. The pine cones are good for the small one, especially, as
are the twigs. I’m going to light the fires for the camp stoves now. So, I have two camp stoves. They’re both cheap camp stoves.
This one was about $16 and this one was about $25 on Amazon. And they don’t use anything except wood, leaves, pine cones. I’ve gathered the twigs and the pine cones, put a few dry
leaves, and here is my match. I don’t like using paper. Just for fun, I prefer using only
natural materials to start fire. And this is where we’re going to make breakfast. Here we go. So, here we go! We got our two fires going with no
artificial methods. All we used was a match and twigs, small sticks, leaves, and
pine cones. And now, we’re about ready to cook. And here we have our breakfast: scrambled eggs, oatmeal with
honey, and some Brazilian coffee that we’re just about to make. In my opinion, the least fun part of camping—especially
rustic camping like this—is washing dishes. But you have to do it, right? So, here we have just a couple of cups that still need
washing. Put a little water in, and you just need a sponge and some
dish soap—that’s all you need. And, a tip: don’t expect to get your dishes … woops, I
spilled some water there. Don’t expect to get your dishes super clean, just do your
best, cause in these conditions, you really can’t get 100%
cleanliness. So, I’m gonna show you now the stoves working. It’s dinner time now. We made breakfast, we made lunch, now
it’s dinner time. So, I’m gonna scramble some eggs. Hmm, this flame is very strong. Wow! The temperature really gets quite hot! And over here we’re boiling some water. So, last night, we had fish and shrimp dinner. It was
delicious! And tonight, we have a baked potato with cheese inside—it
looks amazing—scrambled eggs, and then, veggie bowl burrito. We’re gonna have some white wine, a little bit of orange
juice, and this is just a wonderful dinner. So, I’m glad you could join us for this intermediate-level
lesson of Natural English in a camping / outdoors
environment. We had a lot of fun together. Here is the intermediate-level vocabulary from this video. College… College… College An institution of higher education created to educate and
grant degrees; often a part of a university. Breakfast… Breakfast… Breakfast… The first meal of the day, usually in the morning. Wood… Wood… Wood… the hard, fibrous lignified substance under the bark of
trees. Camp… Camp… Camp… Temporary lodgings in the country for travelers or
vacationers. Leaves… Leaves… Leaves… The main organ of photosynthesis and transpiration in higher
plants. Fun… Fun… Fun… Activities that are enjoyable or amusing. Eggs… Eggs… Animal reproductive body, especially the thin-shelled reproductive body laid by female
birds. Dinner… Dinner… The main meal of the day served in the evening or at midday. I used the word ‘gonna’ several times in this video. It is equivalent to ‘going to’. However, ‘gonna’ is considered slang and it’s not acceptable
in formal or written english. You can use ‘going to’, or ‘gonna’ when speaking, to talk about what you, or someone, is planning to do at
this moment or in the near future. For example, you’re going to learn new vocabulary in today’s lesson or, I’m going to finish this vídeo in a few seconds. Our video’s not over yet. Before we go to sleep, of course, we have to roast some
marshmallows. Camila and I got some good marshmallow roasting sticks and
on this nice campfire, and we’re slowly roasting our marshmallows. And then we can eat them plain or with some
chocolate.Subtitle If we had graham crackers, then we would have smores. Smores are a combination of marshmallows, chocolate, and
graham crackers — kind of like a very, very sweet and a little smoky sandwich. This is wonderful to be here with Camila and enjoy this
evening on Mt. Greylock, roasting marshmallows. All right… So, you can have marshmallows golden roasted, which takes
some time, or you can just burn them like Camila did, and they taste
pretty good, too. “Do you like eating, marshmallows, Camila?” “Yes, I do.” “Are you going to eat that burned one?”

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