Safe Drinking Water While Traveling | Stay Hydrated & Avoid Getting Sick on Your Trip

Safe Drinking Water While Traveling | Stay Hydrated & Avoid Getting Sick on Your Trip


Hey there, it’s Ernest from Trip Astute.
Today we’re tackling a common travelers question, which is, “can i drink
the water here?” Getting sick when traveling is an awful experience. Being
exposed to new environments, foods, and bacteria can really put a damper on your
trip. While there’s a whole list of foods that you probably want to avoid when
traveling (and we’ll cover that in another video) a common question that I
hear from a lot of travelers ask is “can I drink the tap water?” I recently saw an
article on Lifehacker that talked about where you can find safe and reliable
drinking water. I’ve included a link in the description below, so definitely
check it out. However, the only thing I will add is that even though the graphic
shows which countries have safe or unsafe drinking water, I think that there
are nuances within different countries. For example, Costa Rica is listed as
having unsafe drinking water, however, in my experience, it really depends where
you are in Costa Rica. Areas like Arenal are known to have extremely clean and
pure water. Other areas that are more remote or near coastal towns may have
less clean or unsafe drinking water. Even my Lonely Planet book lists Costa Rica as
having safe drinking water. When traveling in an area without safe
drinking water, you basically have three options. One is to buy bottled water. This
is generally the easiest option. Luckily, in places where water is unsafe, bottled
water tends to be very cheap. For example, when I traveled through Vietnam and
Cambodia, you can often buy a large bottle of water that would last the
entire day for less than one dollar. Number two is to filter or purify your
own water. There are a couple of devices that will disinfect or filter your water. I
personally have a SteriPen which is a device that basically disinfect your
water with UV rays. I’ve used it on several occasions and I’ll do a full
gear review at some point. I’ve also seen people use Life Straws and filtration
bottles, which seem to work well. Backpacking Bananas did a great review
of the Life Straw, and I’ll include a link in this video. The third option is
to boil water. This typically isn’t a convenient option. But if you must, it’s
recommended that you boil the water for one minute to make it safe. If you’re in higher altitudes, you’re going to want to boil
the water for three minutes. While I’m conscious of the environmental impact of
buying bottled water, I do find it to be the easiest option. I guess the thought
of taking unsafe water and trying to purify it leaves a lot of room for
contamination. Also, I just prefer not to carry another device with me if I can
avoid it. I’ve included the Amazon links to some
of the products mentioned in this video. I do get a percentage if you use my
Amazon link. It doesn’t cost you anything, but it helps me to build content for
this channel. Do you have any stories or experiences from your travels? If so,
leave them in the comment section below. Also, if you have any questions or
comments, please leave them below too. If you enjoyed this video or found it
useful, please hit the “like” button. Also, please consider subscribing. It’s free
and you’ll get notifications on any updates to the channel. Until next time,
travel safe and travel smart.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *