So You Want to Be a Google Summer of Code Student?

So You Want to Be a Google Summer of Code Student?


[upbeat music] Morrison: The Google Summer of Code program is about making sure both our student and the projects they work on are successful. Dang: We do everything we can to make sure we match the right student with the right organization. Downey: If you have an interest in open source software development and you’re passionate about technology, we’d love to have you apply for Google Summer of Code. Gichoya: The best way to get up to speed is to read the student guide. Abbott: It will help you at each step of the process. Morrison: You should definitely
look at past proposals. Downey: And you’ll need to
keep an eye on the timeline, which is available starting in
January on the program website. Dang: I would recommend you to
talk to the community and mentors when organizations
have been announced. Gichoya: You can contact them
directly to learn more about their project ideas
before the application period. Abbott: So students who get in
contact with their organization early are more likely to have
strong proposals and have a higher chance of
getting accepted. [upbeat music] man singing: Hey. Abbott: A great proposal is… Morrison: Thoughtful…
Gichoya: Well-documented… Downey: Easy to read… Dang: Long enough but not a
book. Morrison: Mentors have many
proposals to read and need to grasp them quickly. Gichoya: You should send your
proposal draft to the organization earlier on in the student application
period… Downey: Which gives them time
to offer feedback… Dang: And for you to address
the feedback in your next proposal
iteration. Abbott: Include any previous
experience that you have and any of your interests that
will help support your work on the project. Morrison: Set realistic
milestones for yourself about what you can accomplish
during the 12 weeks. Downey: Communicate early and
often. We ask students each year what
advice they’d give to other students. Gichoya: This year, over 90% of
the successful students said communication is the most
important part of GSoC. Abbott: Confused about
something? Don’t be timid.
Ask the community. Dang: Best practice is to
always communicate publicly, except for private matters,
of course. Morrison: Ask your mentor. Gichoya: Ask your community. Downey: There are groups like
IRC, chat rooms, Slack, group mailings lists, forums. Abbott: Be sure to ask the
other students via the discuss list. Morrison: Ask Google via the
support address. Dang: Apply early. Gichoya: Never wait until the
last minute to apply. Downey: You can keep editing
your draft proposal right up until the end. Abbott: Beware, if you wait
until the last minute, it’s a huge risk. Morrison: Be sure to read the
instructions on your dashboard on the site and submit your
final PDF and your required proof of
enrollment in a university program. Dang: Watch the “How to Succeed
at GSoC” video.

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