Teen Summer Safety

Teen Summer Safety


Heartbeat/Ambulance Siren Sound As you can see, those are some pretty shocking
statistics. Hi, I’m Sean Keefer, with the Indiana Department of Labor’ Safety and
Health Division, INSafe. Keeping you safe on-the-job is a top priority for the State
of Indiana, and with nearly three million Hoosiers in the workplace, we need your help
to accomplish that. As you prepare to begin a new job, you will need to know some basic
information that’s going to give you a better chance to stay safe and accident free while
working. The following video features safety experts from the Indiana Department of Labor
who will be addressing questions posed by young adults just like yourselves about workplace
safety and health. The purpose of this video is to prevent you from becoming one of our
Startling Statistics and empowering you to make smart and safe decisions. This summer I will be working at a job which
requires me to spend most of my time outdoors. What are the most important things I need
to know to stay safe while I am outside? When working outside, you will be exposed
to many elements, some of which can be hazardous. In order to protect yourself from natural
elements such as the sun, insects, plants and animals there are few things you need
to know. First, choose your clothing with natural elements
in mind. Always wear light colors, as dark colors tend to attract the suns rays and may
cause you to overheat. Drink lots of water to stay properly hydrated. Also, you may be
required to wear long sleeved shirts and long pants, which will protect your skin from the
sun as well as decrease the likelihood that you will have direct contact with plants such
as poison ivy or poison oak. As well, always apply sunscreen (spf 15 or
higher) and insect repellent containing DEET, and don’t forget that you may have to reapply
these when working outside for long periods of time. As for animals…don’t touch them.
If you wouldn’t want them living in your house, you really don’t want to play with
them either. You’re a stranger in their home, so they are going to be defensive. They
can, and probably will, bite. Are there any other hazards I should know
about? That’s a good question. Depending on where
you work, you may also be exposed to other hazards. These other hazards may include vehicles,
such as trucks, cars and ATVs. Electrical sources, such as outlets, power cords and
electrical boxes can be hazardous, as well as work with chemicals like insecticides,
bleach, paint and paint thinner. Work outside may also involve working with lawnmowers and
other machines with moving parts. To stay safe it is important to remain visible
and be aware of your surroundings. While working near moving vehicles, wear light color clothing
and keep in mind, if you can’t see the driver, the driver can’t see you. Also know the
hazards associated with electricity—heed voltage warning signs. Electrical hazards
can be very dangerous and deadly. These hazards can cause burns, shocks and electrocution. As for chemicals, they should always be labeled,
used in well ventilated areas and never mixed. When working with lawnmowers, never put your
hands anywhere near lawnmower blades. See a supervisor for assistance should the lawnmower
stop working properly In addition, depending on the type of work
you will be doing, your employer will likely require you to wear some form of PPE. Remembering
these basic rules will help keep you safe on the job. Wait, what’s PPE? Most jobs, especially those located outdoors
or involving electrical equipment or machinery, require that employees wear personal protective
equipment or PPE. Some of the most common types of PPE include Eye Protection, Ear Plugs,
Gloves and Boots. If you will be working in a noisy environment
such as one with loud electrical equipment, hearing protection, such as ear plugs, may
be required to reduce the risk of hearing impairment. If you will be performing tasks such as cutting
wood, landscaping and other work outside, eye protection will be required to prevent
debris or sharp objects from coming into contact with your eyes. 0:03:27.779,0:03:33.279
For jobs such as weeding, working with plants
or picking up branches, gloves should be utilized
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to protect you from cuts and splinters, and
to help you avoid contact with plants such
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0:03:38.269,0:03:41.400
as poison ivy and poison oak. When working outdoors, boots may be required
to give you more stability on uneven or slippery walking surfaces and to support your ankles
to prevent sprains and strains. Steel toed or safety boots may be necessary for some
occupations, to protect your feet from falling objects. Depending on your specific job, your employer
will inform you what types of Personal Protective Equipment you will be required to wear. But, I’m going to be working in an office,
doing mainly administrative things like paperwork. There really aren’t that many risks inside,
right? While working in an office environment is
not particularly hazardous, injuries can occur. Situations, such as electrical cords across
walkways, leaving low drawers open or objects falling from overhead can lead to injuries
in an office setting. At times, you may have to retrieve something that is out of reach.
Ladders or stepstools may be used in these instances, but make sure they are secure,
stable, and tall enough to reach the desired object. Never lean to reach something while
standing on a ladder, and never use a chair or a box as a substitute for a ladder. Whether
it is being used indoors or outside, you should never ever stand on the top of a ladder. Regardless of where you work, be aware of
your surroundings, in order to decrease the likelihood that you will be involved in a
workplace accident that could have otherwise been avoided. How do I know if something at my job is considered
hazardous or an unsafe activity? That’s a good question, and one that many
people don’t know the answer to. If you come across a coworker engaging in a behavior
that you know to be unsafe, let them know, because they may not realize hat it is hazardous.
In this case, an employee was mixing chemicals and he was unaware that what he was doing
was dangerous. His coworker saw the hazard and let him know about the potential danger. If it looks like it is unsafe, it probably
is. Trust your instincts, remain alert, and don’t engage in actions that could turn
safe conditions into potentially hazardous situations. It is important as well, to be aware of your
surroundings at all times. Actions that can cause a safe situation to turn hazardous include
horseplay or goofing around and talking or texting on your cell phone while working.
Engaging in activities such as texting distracts you, slows down your reaction time and can
result in serious or fatal accidents while on the job. What do I do if I see an unsafe work condition,
or if my boss asks me to do something that is unsafe? Your safety and health is a top priority.
If you observe a behavior or work condition that is not safe, you should immediately report
it to your supervisor. If your supervisor is asking you to do something that is unsafe,
report it to another person in charge. Conditions that you should report to a superior
include…Hostility from fellow employees, drug or alcohol use, the use of unmarked chemicals
or liquids, performing tasks without the proper protective equipment, and using broken or
faulty equipment. Your employer has the duty to provide you
with a safe working environment. If you feel your safety is being jeopardized, you should
not hesitate to bring it to someone’s attention. “I’ve always wanted to know, if I get
hurt on the job, what should I do?” Regardless of the severity, all injuries and
illnesses should be reported to your supervisor immediately. A small cut can lead to a much
more severe infection, deterring from your ability to work. Your work site should be
equipped with a basic 1st Aid Kit. Make sure that you know where the 1st Aid Kit is located
and that it is fully stocked. Also, be sure to know what the protocol is if you become
injured. For injuries which cannot be taken care of with your 1st Aid Kit, your supervisor
can help you determine the proper course of treatment. While this video did not cover every hazard
or every scenario that you may encounter in the workplace, your supervisor will ensure
that you have the proper training to stay safe while working. Do your part to make safety
a priority and don’t let your actions turn a safe workplace into a hazardous situation. Now that you’ve learned a little more about
workplace safety, let’s take a look at some obvious workplace hazards and see if you can
identify them… Can you spot the safety hazards in the following
images? Hazard Number 1, see if you can spot the hazard
in this picture. Ladders should never be stacked on top of each other. When working at heights
beyond the ladder’s reach, an extension ladder should be used. Next, try to spot the hazard in this picture.
When on elevated surfaces, railing or fall protection is required to minimize the probability
of falling. See if you can spot the hazard in this wire
nest. Be cautious. To reduce the likelihood of electrical shock, it is important to not
overload electrical outlets. Finally, see if the hazard in this last picture.
When work requires the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), be sure to comply with your
employer’s requirements. After having learned a bit more about safety,
we are able to make light of these pictures. But these are real pictures taken of real
workers engaging in unsafe behaviors that, many times, turn into tragic consequences.
Remember if you think it might be unsafe, it probably is unsafe. A split second decision
in order to do something quicker could lead to a life turning, tragic event. Your work
is important, but ultimately your safety on-the-job is the most important. For additional information
or questions regarding workplace safety, talk with your supervisor and visit our website
at www.in.gov/dol. Thank you for watching and be smart, be safe and have fun in your
new job. Good luck!

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