UWA Graduations – Saturday March 17, 2:00pm

UWA Graduations – Saturday March 17, 2:00pm


Good afternoon everyone, please join me
in thanking the University organist Annette Goerke. Welcome – kaya – my name is Professor Cara MacNish and I’m the Chair of the Academic Board, the peak academic body of the
University, and I’m here to tell you a little about the graduation ceremony, its
history, the people involved, and how this afternoon’s events will proceed. Before
proceedings commence, could I please request that your mobile telephones are
turned down or off, and advise that should an emergency occur in the venue
we will take our lead from the theatre staff. On behalf of all my University
colleagues, I’m delighted to welcome you to this afternoon’s graduation ceremony.
To begin I’d like to acknowledge that our ceremony this afternoon takes place
on Wadjuk Budja, the country of the Noongar people, and pay my respects to
Noongar elders past, present and emerging, as custodians of the historic
place on which we meet. Today’s graduation ceremony is also a traditional
celebration of the University. UWA takes great pride in its history, having
enrolled its first students over a hundred years ago.
However our roots are deeply embedded in the academic values and traditions that
for many centuries have given rise to the world’s finest universities. The
traditional nature of our graduation ceremony serves to highlight this
enduring connection with our heritage, as has been the case in universities across
the globe and throughout the centuries. The ceremony will begin with the arrival
of the academic procession. This procession comprises graduates, scholars,
academics, and office bearers of the University, attired in their formal
academic regalia. UWA is very much an international institution and our
academic staff come from universities from a wide variety of countries and
cultures. So in this afternoon’s procession, you will see a
varied and often colourful array of regalia from around the world. The
procession will be led by graduating students, followed by academic staff in
order of seniority. At the end of the procession will come the principal
officers of the University, members of the University’s governing body the Senate, and our distinguished guests. The final figure in the procession will be the
Chancellor of the University, the Honorable Robert French AC, who is
immediately preceded by the mace bearer. The mace will be carried by a current
student and is a symbolic representation of the authority invested
in the Chancellor, who is the chair of the University Senate. After the National
Anthem, the Chancellor will formally welcome all graduates and guests and
guide us through the ceremony. There will be a short musical interlude during the
ceremony, performed by students from the UWA School of Music. You will I believe
find much to interest you during this afternoon’s proceedings, but of course
the main reason you have come is to witness the graduation of our scholars, and I hope you will all join with my colleagues and
me in warmly congratulating each graduate who comes on to the stage to
have his or her degree conferred. And while it is an historic setting, it is
also a celebration and I invite you to express your enthusiasm wholeheartedly
as our graduates are awarded their degrees. And a little secret, a bit of
whistling or hooting is fine too. There will be a professional video and
photographs of the ceremony, and professional photographers waiting
downstairs. But please do feel free to stand where
you are to capture your own images of the moment . Now would you please all rise to your feet so that the arrival of the academic procession can commence.
Thank you. [Academic procession enters]
[Organ plays] Please be seated ladies and gentlemen. Members of the University, Senate,
distinguished guests, graduands, ladies and gentlemen, it’s a pleasure to welcome
you to our eleventh autumn graduation ceremony. I particularly want to
acknowledge the presence at the ceremony of Ms Fadzi Whande who will deliver the
graduation address, Ms Jessica Moran who will deliver the valedictory address,
the Warden of Convocation Dr Doug McGhie, members of the Senate, Emeritus Professor Lynette Abbott, Emeritus Professor Craig Atkins, and former Chancellor’s Medal recipient Ms Annette Goerke. The University of Western Australia
in accordance with its tradition acknowledges the custodians and
traditional owners of the land on which any of its campuses are located. At the
main campus Crawley, the university acknowledges the Wadjuk Noongar
people as the traditional owners of the land on which it is situated. The Wadjuk
Noongar remain the spiritual and cultural custodians of their land, and
continue to practice their values, languages, belief and knowledge today.
Ladies and gentlemen we share in a ceremony which is deeply rooted in the
history and tradition of universities in this country, and around the world.
It marks the formal recognition by the University of the achievements of its
graduates in meeting the standards and requirements of the various courses of
study and research, which they have undertaken over a number of years. The
ceremony joins them with members of the academic staff who have taught them or
supervised their work, and with representatives of the Convocation of
the University, which is part of the University, and which as graduates they
join. The ceremony also brings the graduates together with parents, friends
and other relatives, who have supported them in their work, and share intimately
in their achievements, and who are particularly welcome here today. This
University has a long history of achievement and excellence in teaching
and research and engagement with the wider community
for the benefit of the state, the nation, and indeed the global community, of which
we are all a part. It was established in the words of the University of Western
Australia Act 1911 ‘to advance the prosperity and welfare of the people.’ It
was the product of the vision and energy and commitment of extraordinary
individuals who founded it, and who were its benefactors. Its achievements are the
achievements of people. Those who teach and research here. Those who govern and
administer the university and the alumni who go from this place to make their
contributions in a myriad of different ways. So it’s not just a degree with
which you leave this place. It is a degree from the University of Western
Australia, which is one of Australia’s leading universities and according to
international rankings, one of the world’s leading universities. Each of you
who graduate here today will be presented with a new message stick,
carrying with it the story of this place. According to Indigenous beliefs, tribal
boundaries were established by the great spirits of the Dreamtime. No human had
the right to interfere with those boundaries or to venture onto others’
tribal lands. However the bearer of a message stick could cross those
boundaries. They were traditional passports from one nation to another in
Indigenous Australia, seen as carrying the stories of Indigenous people across
the land. So in a symbolic way we entrust the story of this place to you, to carry
it into the world. The gift symbolises a permanent connection expressed in the
timeless language of the Noongar people. For all of you, I express the hope that
the knowledge and skills you have acquired at this University, will enable
you to follow the lifelong path reflected in its motto to seek wisdom,
and to apply it for the good of all. Ladies and gentlemen, it’s now my
pleasure to invite the deputy Vice-Chancellor (Education) Professor
David Sadler to give a brief opening address to today’s graduates, and their
guests. Excuse me while I put my glasses on.
Chancellor, graduates, parents, partner,s and friends of the
University. Congratulations, it is my privilege to congratulate you on behalf
of the University of Western Australia. Today’s ceremony is an opportunity for
all of us, graduating students, parents, friends, and staff, to formally recognise
and celebrate your outstanding achievement in graduating from UWA. As
you probably are feeling just at the moment, graduation is a culmination of
many years hard work, and I hope you will remember your time as a UWA student with
pride, excitement, and accomplishment. During your time here you would have
enjoyed moments of great joy and satisfaction, as well as endured setbacks
and challenges. The disciplines that you have chosen to immerse yourself in have
unique opportunities and experiences, which will significantly prepare
you for your future at many levels. You should feel a great sense of
pride at how those years of persistence and resilience have paid off, as you sit
in this beautiful hall with your fellow graduates, surrounded by your loved ones
and friends to celebrate, and look into the future with ambition and with
purpose. We have provided you with something greater than world-class
education. Being a student is much more than providing you with access to
academic excellence. I hope you have found time as a UWA student to become
involved in the many facets of campus life; clubs, societies, overseas exchange,
work experience, or learning and community internships for example. All
such experiences have offered you an opportunity to further develop your
skills and prepare you for the future. Our graduates have been making a
difference at a local, national and international level for more than 100
years. So much has changed during this time of course, and our graduates are now
emerging into a rapidly changing world. In science for example, one of our
graduates went on to pursue a career in physics, pairing science and music
research to pioneer acoustic sharp detection technology. He has been working
in underwater acoustics for nearly 15 years and was awarded a major
commercialisation grant from the West Australian Government, to test the
concepts developed in his PhD in a shark detector. A first for a UWA PhD student,
Shane took a PhD subject that even our own Navy has no experience in, and his
methods are now patentable. You should feel confident that you
are well-prepared to take your place in a highly competitive working environment.
You have mastered subject matter concepts and techniques, and acquired skills that
equip you for lifelong learning. We find ourselves today in a period of
disruption, turbulence and global uncertainty. There is much conjecture
about our future world, including what the jobs in the careers of the future
will look like. You’re also graduating at a time when the rise of populism has
spawned terms such as fake news, alternative facts, and post truth.
Globalisation undoubtedly brings many opportunities and provided us with some
areas for critical debate and intelligent dialogue. But this is why knowledge and
its application to societal issues has never been more important. I urge you to
use the knowledge and the skills you have learned, especially the power of
critical thinking, to rally against this populist trend and then demonstrate that
knowledge, facts and evidence matter. Some commentators are suggesting that
graduates of the future are likely to have five careers and up to 17 jobs, and
that 40% of jobs that currently exist will not be there in the future,
not necessarily disappearing but changing. And for you is the opportunity
to create that future and opportunities for others.
We hope that your UWA degree will empower and equip you to succeed in a
career of your choosing and possibly a career that is not yet even created. Each
of you has the capacity to make a difference to society, whether it’s
through some major scientific or engineering breakthrough, through the
arts, or through business innovation. But just as importantly, you have developed
the capacity to embrace change, provide innovative solutions, and to question and
be open to new ideas and possibilities. This is an exciting time for you. A time
to rise to the challenge of what comes next. Many of our graduates here today
are already making their mark, having achieved great things during their time
at UWA. During the year, several of our graduates have been recognised with awards and honours for their important achievements in science. The faculty
awarded a total of 165 prizes and scholarships in 2017. That is an
incredible achievement. Your faculty also had 88 students take part in study
abroad program in universities around the world. What a wonderful way to get
some international experience and education. I’d now like to share with you
a quote from Wendy Kopp, co-founder and CEO of Teach For All, a global network of educational non-profit organisations, about the power of
experience. She writes, ‘I often hear from my new
graduates that it’s better to wait until you have more experience. But I’m a big
believer in the power of inexperience. It was the greatest asset I had when I
started Teach For All. If I’d known at the outset how hard it was going to be, I
might never have started. The world needs you before you stop asking naive
questions, and while you have the time to understand the true nature of the
complex problems we face. and take them on.’ I am delighted that you chose to
study at this university and sad to see those of you that are leaving us leave.
But of course this is not farewell. You will always be part of the UWA community.
You will always be welcome here and we will do our best to support you through
your careers. In turn, I hope you will stay connected and become an active
alumni member. What makes you very special and unique is that when the
university was established, our founders place great importance on
building a community of graduates. Convocation exists to ensure all
graduates have a lifelong connection to this University. Graduates, your hard work
and dedication have led you to this moment, and wherever your journey leads
from here you should be very proud of your achievements. This is your day. Enjoy
it. Congratulations to you all. It is now my pleasure to introduce our
guest speaker Fadzi Whande. Fadzi is a global diversity and inclusion
strategist, award-winning social justice advocate, and manager for inclusion and
diversity here. Her background ranges from launching telecommunication networks to
addressing financial literacy, unemployment, social disadvantage, gender
inequality and racial equity in Zimbabwe, Botswana, the UK, USA and
Australia. Over the course of her career, she’s been recognised multiple times for
her efforts to promote inclusion and diversity and was recently appointed a
2018 Australia Day ambassador. Please welcome Fadzi. Good afternoon Chancellor, deputy
Vice-Chancellor, members of the Senate. Ladies and gentlemen, and to the
graduating class of 2018, it is a privilege and honour to be able to stand
before you this afternoon and address you, and give the graduation
speech. I’d first of all like to acknowledge the traditional custodians
of the land on which we meet. I think it’s always important for us to
acknowledge the journey that has led to us being here and so every time I am
privileged to hear a welcome to country or acknowledgement to country I think
about the sacrifices that a lot of people have made for me to be able to
call Australia home. I think about the sacrifices my own family have made for
me to be where I am and so in that light I think about the traditional custodians,
those past and present and any members of the Indigenous community that are
with us today, and I just want to pay my respects and say that because of you we
are. Today is a really important day for some of you. And I know that my journey
began in 2012 right here at UWA and I’d like to particularly shout out to any
single mothers that are with us here. Whether you’re here to honour your
children or whether you yourself are graduating, and I want to honour them.
Because in 2012 at the year that I was turning 40, I found myself here at UWA embarking on a university journey. I had just gone
through a really terrible divorce. I had been in Australia at that time for about
four years, didn’t really know anyone and I decided I needed to reinvent myself. So
what should I do. I should go to university. I was under
the impression that coming to university would help restore sanity, obviously that
was short-lived. Assignments and readings and all the
things that come with it, as I’m sure those who are graduating today would
know. But it was a journey that I really enjoyed, and in the journey I realised
just how resilient I was. And I think that it was Eleanor Roosevelt who
actually said, ‘Women are like tea bags. You never know how strong they are until
you get them in hot water.’ A lot of the times that I was here, I
experienced what it was like to be in hot water, but one of the things that
kept me going was just the encouragement of my fellow students, and those that I
participated in a lot of group assignments with. I learned a few things
along the way. Particularly about not to go out partying and expect to pay
attention to a tutor the very next day when you’re sitting in the front row. There’s a lot of things that I learned, but one of the things that I
really want to share with you is really to look at what it means to seek wisdom.
It has been said that to acquire knowledge, one must study. But to acquire
wisdom, we must observe. And so I ask you what have you observed in the time that
you’ve been here, because wisdom really is not about what we learn at university,
but it’s a lifelong journey and as our founding motto tells us, seeking wisdom
is something that I’ve learned to translate in my life. And what does that
look like. For me, wisdom is defined as the ability to use your experience and
knowledge in order to make sensible decisions or judgements. I’ve often
wondered whether my decisions have been sensible, but in seeking wisdom I’ve also
thought what does it mean to resort to, to attain, to acquire, or to gain.
Aristotle said knowing yourself is the beginning of all wisdom and I think that
couldn’t be said. It’s just so true. Because authenticity and knowing who you
are is the beginning, and the quest that we must all strive for. And the more we
look outside of ourselves to create a sense of self, the farther off track we go.
How can we know who we truly are when we spend our time trying to win the
approval of others. And that’s something that I learned when I was here. That for
me to be able to achieve whatever success I set out for myself ,I had to really
understand and pay attention to what I was saying. Not try and be cool. Not
trying to be you know that person who who tried to act young. You know, like
I said, when I came here I was turning 40. And I know that’s a shock to you, but I
guess I am a living symbol of the adage that black don’t crack. So what I would like to say is the world
needs you to be you. As you embark on that journey just remember that. Remember
that it is so important to be inclusive, and as a global diversity and inclusion
strategist, I cannot stand here and not actually encourage you and advocate for
inclusivity. We are good at being diverse. We only have to look around the room to
see how diverse we are. What we haven’t learnt is to be inclusive. We haven’t
learnt to give voice to those that are often times silenced, and I want to
encourage you as you go out into the world, to take that with you. To remember
to be inclusive and create spaces where everybody can fit in and belong. Remember
that being true to yourself means that you give others permission to be true to
themselves. Part of being authentic is also what we gain when we allow multiple,
multiple perspectives to shape our narrative. And to much in this world,
they’re the voices of those who are undermined, underrepresented, often go
unheard, and so I want to challenge you to be the group that actually seeks out
to be more inclusive, and allow the spaces that you inhabit to be inhabited
by many. The reality is failure should be your friend,
because we learn a lot through failure. And we shouldn’t be scared of failing. We
only have to think about our John Winthrop Hackett, who this Hall s named
after. He had a failed history of politics and even tried to be a squatter.
That didn’t work, and then he became Chancellor of UWA. Failure is not
necessarily a bad thing. If you allow yourself to learn from that and I know
that there’s a lot of cliches about it, but I would challenge you to make
failure your friend. Take it out to dinner. Just don’t let failure cook for you. Oprah said that sometimes you find
what you’re supposed to do, by doing the things that you’re not supposed to do,
and that might be true for some of you here. That you might decide and discover
what your passions are in learning things that you might not have wanted to
learn. It certainly is true for me and my journey. I never set out to be an
inclusion and diversity specialist or strategist. I just find myself in spaces
where I was just passionate about speaking up for those that often went
underrepresented, and as a black female I had a lot of intersectionalities of
diversity and experience that I could draw from. So we all have at one time or
another experienced things. Each of us has a story. You have a story, and as you
consider what your next steps are I want to encourage you to be bold enough to
continue to seek wisdom. Looking around this room I see limitless possibility. I
see dreams that haven’t been dreamt, places that haven’t been visited and
alumni that are world changers. You have a critical role to play, not only in the
future of UWA, but also in your community. In our city of Perth, in our lovely
nation of Australia and the world at large, I challenge you to be mindful of
the stories that you tell and the stories that you listen to. Because each
of us has a story. The buildings that we inhabit have stories. The streets are
flags. There’s a lot of stories that need to be told. And so as you go out I
challenge you to do that. The late African icon Nelson Mandela said that
education is the most powerful weapon which you can use to change the world. Fellow UWA graduates and alumni those words have been spoken. The mandate has
been given. Your education and your continued seeking of wisdom are cheering
and the call has been given. Let’s go out and change the world. Thank you. Thank You Padre for a terrific and
inspiring speech. I hadn’t heard that tea bag simile before, but I certainly
won’t forget it. I think you will agree that Ms Whande’s
address is a fitting introduction to the primary purpose of this ceremony, which
is to confer upon graduands degrees and diplomas of the University, in
recognition of their academic achievement. My name is Tony O’Donnell.
I’m the Pro Vice-Chancellor and Executive Dean of the Faculty of Science.
It is my pleasure today to present graduates to the Chancellor for
conferral of the award of diploma and degree of bachelor of this University.
Chancellor for the Diploma in Science Ayesha Roseanne Lapinski Nicholas James Potter Julian Leon van der Zanden
For the Degree of Bachelor of Arts with a Major in Human Geography and Planning
Lucinda Susan Lefroy
Hugh William Marchbank For the Degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in Agricultural Science Jack Francis Beeck Darren Ryan de Vos Ashleigh Michelle Mary Donnison Jarrod Bentley Hargreaves Tze Xuan Gabriel Pang Yoshihiro Tada Natasha Ruth Vermeulen
Madison Chloe Voak For the Degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
Uditi Kamesh Bhatt Morgan Naveen Biggs Giles Glenn Calvert Ryan Peter Connery Breanna Shae Dixon Tia Christine Evers Beatrice Yan-Lam Ho
Laura Elizabeth Johanson Lim Hui Min Mindy Michelle May Shien Low
Kim Toby Melville Eugene Seow Qun Zhou Jordyn James Taylor
For the Degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in Botany Freya Lea Crozier
Julian August Jeeves-Bonte Joshua Harry Kestel For the Degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in Chemistry
Kay Yin Ang Zoe Zaneta Castleden
Charlotte Louise Coppock Alice Rita Dix-Matthews Michael Robert Hall
Alice Hashiguchi Patrick John Charles James Kelly Siobhan Jones Debbie Wei Ding Lau
Nurmasyitah Binte Othman
Courtney Nika Press William John Stowell
Jackson Ty Stubberfield Monica Mei Yee Tan Weiting Zhao
For the Degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in Conservation Biology
Zahra Tiara Aisya Joseph Michael Caspersz-Loney Amelia Catterick-Stoll Chun Sang Fung Maddison Shea Howard Jasmine Lynn Chelsea Keren Neill
Chelsea Laura Pringle Lauren Miriam Pullella Ellen Rose Watson Calum Joseph Duncan Woods For the Degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in Environmental Science Bianca Rosa Bertelli
Steven James Castle Nicholas Andrew Courts Jack Elias Burke D’Souza Ellen Renee Dolecki Shae Evan Dorrington
Bayley James Du Plessis Jasmin Kate Eardley-Wilmot Benjamin Noel Fosbery Sarah Patricia Gerrard Braydon Sonny Graham
Evelyn Jia Yuan Hiew Keara Imogen Jacobs Alanna Maree Kursar
Pak Phi Lee
Hazel Liem Adrian Thomas Mennie Kate Louise Nicol Emma Ryan Kang Tam For the Degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in Geographical Sciences Christian Berger
Vienna Maddison Schnell For the Degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in Geography
Emily Caitlin Lassila For the Degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in Geology Terrence Robert Brown
Robert John Hoschke Danielle Nicole Kelly Gemma Maria Leftley Nicholas Francis Mcmahon Tyson Kyle Ockelford Ethan Gi-Yan Tang Sylvester
For the Degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in Marine Science
Cecilie Haarstad Andersen
Sam Daniel Bock Henry George Carrick Sophie May Cochrane Anneke Janette Dearlove
Emily Rose Fosbery
Brendan Thomas Gerrard Hanna Christina Gustavson
Liam John Hamersveld Alexandra Jayne Hegarty Joanne Lim Zhen Ying Ashley Crystal Marino Kohta Mitsuishi
Mohamed Kaisan Raiyan Bin Mohamed Hussain Ella Marine Golda Rosengart
Katie Rebecca Trimbell
Siahn Leslee Nardi Todd Thomas Hoffmann For the Degree of Bachelor of Science with a Major in Zoology
Keely Paige Boston-Budd Jennifer Lee Bruyn Karly Jade Burrell Olivia Gale Delaney
Akshay Emmanuel Gomez-Jackson
Georgia Anne Hadlow Nicholas James Hart Saumya Chandini Hiyare Hewage
Rebekah Valerie Hortin
Claudia Odette Houston Amy Laura Hutchison Erin Rose Hynes Tazia Maree Lemon Amy Kathleen Mcalpine
Jessica Kate McLeod Breanna Claire Muste Caitlin Eve Nagle
Clare Megan Amy Nyberg Candace Anita Parkyn Lyndall Janaye Pengelly
Chiat Ying, Felicia Phua
Kate Elizabeth Rick
Rebekah Lee Stone Jessica Kate Tacey For the Degree of Bachelor of Science with Honours
Natasha Anne Brown Andrew Francis Henson
Rose Joan Zolnier Kerr
Amy Leigh Kretzmann Kelsie Zena Lambert Tullem Selby McKiever Kristen Karri Nilsson Lucas Silva Pires Annabel Jane Silvestri
Zahra Abbas Hannah Carmel Adam
Dennis Patrick Byrne Colby James Bignell Deanne Louise Cummins
Elissa Jane Edward George Darcy Edwards Oliver Thomas Gierymski Mabel Lily Alexandra Gill-Hille Angus Adam Gillespie Matthew Hayden Vincent Graneri
Christian Thrane Haakansson
Dominika Mary Jusko Brock Leighton Keymer Zakary Marcus Langtry
Ryan Eian Lopez
Jessica Michelle Moran Jaylen David Nicholson
Michael James Nutt Sophie Olivia Perring
Zachary John Sudholz AND Weilu Zhang On behalf of the University, I confer the
award of diploma and degree of bachelor upon the graduates presented to me by
the Pro Vice-Chancellor and the Executive Dean of the Faculty of Science. The University is very proud of its
Conservatorium of Music and of the performance standards of its students. I
therefore have great pleasure in introducing a brief musical interlude by
members of Con-Cantorum, one of the UWA vocal ensembles who will be performing
Feelin’ Good. [Musical recital] Thank you again Con-Cantorum. It is now my pleasure to present
graduates to the Chancellor for conferral of the degree of master
of this University. Chancellor for the For the Degree of Master of Agricultural Science (Agricultural Economics)
Yanmin Yu For the Degree of Master of Agricultural Science (Agricultural Economics) with Distinction Daniel Richard Cichy
For the Degree of Master of Agricultural Science (Agricultural Systems)
Stacey Louise Hansch For the Degree of Master of Agricultural Science (Genetics and Breeding)
Hediyeh Tahghighi For the Degree of Master of Agricultural Science (Soil Science)
Ming Cao For the Degree of Master of Agricultural Science (Soil Science and Plant Nutrition) Ellie Denise Stone
Chia Chia Wu
For the Degree of Master of Biological Science (Conservation Biology)
Paul William Brandon Jun Jie Wong For the Degree of Master of Biological Science (Marine Biology)
Yu Bi Brooke Mikaela Fennell Ross Hammond Gillis
Caroline Robyn Hart Leanne Marie Ward For the Degree of Master of Biological Science (Zoology)
Anchal Gupta Bryce Michael Henderson
Brittany Rose Osborn Sian Marama Thorn Matteo Tommaso Ungaro
For the Degree of Master of Biotechnology Jessica Lee Andrews
Mitchell Steven Bestry Christine Ishak Alfred Demianus Mayor Michael William Murrey For the Degree of Master of Biotechnology with Distinction
Guy Windsor Barrington Rose Isabella McDowell For the Degree of Master of Environmental Science (Environmental Management) Damien Kusumah Arnaud
Joshua Michael Foote Thamara Rathnaseeli Kumaranayake Meredith Xin-Tian Ong
Sofie Charlotte Springer
Thung Tan For the Degree of Master of Environmental Science (Geographic Information Science and Environmental Management)
Chun Ming Cheung
Richard Grieg Olsen Sarah Jean Ravensberg
Ahkeam Mahoon Rawlinson
For the Degree of Master of Environmental Science (Geographic Information Science and Environmental Management) with Distinction Christopher Luke Anderson For the Degree of Master of Environmental Science (Land and Water Management) Colin David Flower
Susan Kate Murrey Monthat Suwannakarn Jack Kie Wang For the Degree of Master of Environmental Science (Land and Water Management) with Distinction
Amy Elizabeth Imbergamo For the Degree of Master of Environmental Science (Marine and Coastal Management) Ella Deanne Marchetti For the Degree of Master of Geographic Information Science
Ren Zhi Jie For the Degree of Master of Geoscience
Yuchen Cai Chan Kar Wai Wenzheng Guo Pengfei Jia Amy Patricia Lassey Aundre Rodrigues Samantha Tan Wei Ling Suet Mei Wan Conghua Zhao Ruoyu Zhao For the Degree of Master of Hydrogeology
Amanda Louise Clements
India Cywinski-Jan Marie Amanda Egan Callum David Gilligan
Anurdha Shanthini Kumari Karavita Arachchi For the Degree of Master of Hydrogeology with Distinction Amy Marie Carlino
For the Degree of Master of International Development Madeline Lee Madvad For the Degree of Master of Science
Lucy Bernadette Anderton For the Degree of Master of Urban and Regional Planning
Yezhou Fan Brooke Elizabeth Hongell
Maxwell Kwaku Osae Michaela Eva Pilossof Lucy Suzette Jane Smith And Aamon Zothner. On behalf of the University, I confer the
degree of master upon the graduands presented to me by the Pro Vice-Chancellor and Executive Dean of the Faculty of Science. My name is Professor Kate Wright and I
am the Dean of the Graduate Research School. It is my pleasure today to
present graduates to the Chancellor for conferral of the degree of Doctor of
this University. To qualify for the award of a doctoral degree of this University,
a graduate is required over not less than three years to complete training at
an advanced level, and to pursue research leading to a thesis that makes a
substantial and original contribution to knowledge. The thesis is examined by
three distinguished scholars of international standing and the
examination process subjects the thesis to criticism and evaluation at the
highest level, and ensures that a recipient of the degree has demonstrated
the ability to carry out successful research, which satisfies rigorous
standards. Chancellor, I now present to you graduates who have completed theses
that have fulfilled the requirements for the award of the degree of Doctor of
this University. Chancellor, for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy and for a
thesis entitled the geography of ageing in the city: An analysis of population dynamics and policy responses in Perth, Western Australia. I present to you,
Mariana Teresa Atkins. For a thesis entitled – Poverty and vulnerability to poverty in Pakistan: Innovative empirical analyses for more effective policy interventions, I present to you,
Muhammad Masood Azeem For a thesis entitled – Understanding the in vitro bioactivity of the forage legume Biserrula pelecinus L. – variability and mechanisms
I present to you Bidhyut Kumar Banik For a thesis entitled – Natural and artificial regulation of Arabidopsis methylome, I present to you
Jonathan Boris Cahn For a thesis entitled – Timescales and mechanisms of sediment transport and shoreline morphodynamics in a fringing reef system, I present to you Michael Vincent William Cuttler For a thesis entitled – The ocean and coastal response to tropical cyclone forcing in the Australian North West region,
I present to you
Edwin Johannes Fokke Drost For a thesis entitled – The pygmy hippopotamus (Choeropsis liberiensis) – An enigmatic oxymoron – How a not-so-small species presents a sizeable conservation challenge
I present to you Gabriella Louise Flacke For a thesis entitled – Paleoproterozoic magmatic history of the southern margin of the North Australian Craton: Implications for local crustal architecture and evolution of the continental crust, I present to you Maria Linda Iaccheri For a thesis entitled – Hydrogen gas sensing with magnetic nanomaterials, I present to you
Chiu Ming Lueng For a thesis entitled – Investigation into the atmospheric degradation of α-phellandrene: A computational, experimental and modelling study, I present to you
Felix Alexander Mackenzie-Rae For a thesis entitled – The synthesis and pharmacological studies on a novel antimicrobial agent & new nickel catalysts and their applications in organic synthesis,
I present to you
Nikki Ying-Tung Man For a thesis entitled – Cultural systems, science and natural resource management: Aboriginal management of wetlands in the west Kimberley, Australia, I present to you Michelle Leanne Pyke For a thesis entitled – Tracing multiscale mineral system processes through sulphur isotopography,
I present to you
Vikraman Selvaraja For a thesis entitled – Are we going against the grain in training? Developing a training and information framework for farmers and agronomists in Australia, I present to you Dominie Gabrielle Wright
And For a thesis entitled – Geochemistry and mineralogy of trace and rare-earth elements in acidified estuarine dredge spoil and associated sulfidic drain sediments, South Yunderup, Western Australia,
I present to you
Xu Nian On behalf of the University, I confer the
degree of Doctor upon the graduands presented to me by the Dean of the
Graduate Research School. I will now invite the Warden of
Convocation, Dr Doug McGee to welcome today’s new graduates. Fellow graduates, as the Warden of
Convocation of the University I congratulate you on your graduation,
first and subsequent. As graduates, you join the diverse and incredibly talented
alumni of this university. Because of UWA’s unique structure and supporting
legislation, you also automatically join Convocation, the representative body of
the graduates, as lifelong members. As members of Convocation,
you now have the right and privilege to share in and contribute to the
intellectual and cultural life of the University, and to stand for election to
the council of Convocation, and for the two places on Senate elected by the members
of Convocation. As a member of Convocation you join over 150,000
graduates who have successfully completed their studies at UWA over the
past 100 years. The friendships you have developed as a student at UWA are
fostered within Convocation to support valued lifelong networks. Convocation
members range from young to older and all are welcome, valued, and supported. As
time passes after graduation, you’ll enjoy seeing and hearing the stories of
success of your fellow students, and this afternoon we have been inspired by one
of your fellow members, Fadze’s story. What an amazing inspirational story. I
hope that you’re able to tell a similar story in years to come. I welcome you as
a member and encourage you to continue the relationship with the University
which began when you chose to study here and continues as a member of Convocation.
Congratulations and best wishes. On behalf of the University, I will now
confer in absentia respective awards upon those graduates who were unable to
be present at this ceremony, and whose names are printed on the paper. Ladies
and gentlemen, we are today celebrating the achievements of our students. It’s
appropriate therefore that a student voice should be heard to mark this
significant occasion. I would like to invite Jessica Moran who graduated today
with the degree of Bachelor of Science with First-Class Honours in Zoology to
deliver the valedictory address on behalf of the graduates. Chancellor, deputy vice-chancellor,
members of Senate, distinguished guests, members of staff, deserving graduates and
their guests, being invited to give the valedictory address I was both honoured
and horrified. It seems ironic that the reward for years of hard work should be
the despised task of public speaking. After a great deal of internal screaming
and sleepless nights, I am overall incredibly grateful for the opportunity
to celebrate our shared success. Writing this address has made me reflect on my
experiences at UWA and acknowledge how much I have changed and learned since
arriving here. Over the past few weeks, seeing first-year students who were born
in the year 2000 has not only brought me into the brink of a quarter life crisis,
but it’s also helped me recognise four life lessons that are unconsciously
gained from a UWA science degree. Lesson number one – no scientist is an island. A tertiary degree, much like life, is impossible to get through alone without
inspiring role models and helping hands. It is difficult to succeed throughout
our science degrees at UWA. We were lucky enough to be surrounded by strong
brilliant women in science. Personally coming from a country town, it has been
incredibly valuable to see that yes I can do it, and I can even do it in a
skirt. I am indebted to the amazing men and women of the Faculty of Science for
the inspiration they provided but also for their generosity and kindness. Like
most students, I also experienced setbacks and challenges during my degree.
However my supervisors and the wonderful team at the Science student office
reminded me that the ability to ask for help is a show of strength, not weakness.
I have no delusions. I certainly would not be standing here giving this address
or even graduating if I had isolated myself and not reached out for
help on numerous occasions. Lesson number two – we are now ambassadors for science. We must use our privilege and credibility
wisely, whether we intended to be or not. Our degrees mean that we are now
ambassadors for science and the lifelong pursuit of knowledge. We find ourselves
in a time of fake news. Every day misinformation is spread by
self-proclaimed experts who research their topics with biased YouTube and
Google searches. So I urge you, be a ruthless science communicator.
Trust no one, seek the truth, do the research and champion real science. We
must start conversations in our communities about the reality of climate
change, the importance of vaccinations and the frightening extinction rates of
species. If we do not use our educated voices, we run the risk of being drowned
out by those who are led by arrogance fear and xenophobic politicians. Lesson
number three – have a five-year plan but still say yes to every opportunity. Plans
are good but being open to opportunity is better. The world is full of endless
possibilities. Like many of today’s graduates, I came to UWA without any idea
what I wanted to do other than work in science. At UWA I gained experience and
more importantly passion by simply saying yes to opportunities. Can you
clean dirty mouse boxes – yes. Can you babysit some lab mice in Spain – yes. Can
you perform micro surgery on bees – yes. Can you collect ant sperm in the
Panamanian rainforest – yes, absolutely. When I started my degree I didn’t know
anything about ants, bees or mice, and I lacked self-confidence. But I learned to
trust other people’s faith in my abilities by ignoring an overwhelming
sense of the imposter syndrome and just saying yes. I found my passion. My very
Swiss honours supervisor who struggled with english sayings always talked about
how ant and bee sperm really blew him off. Despite the unfortunate mis-saying, his
mentorship helps me realise how blown away I could be by bees,
eventually inspiring me to now pursue a PhD on focused on protecting some of our
most important pollinators. Only by being open to opportunities and having the
courage to chase them up, have I ended up here. Lastly lesson number four – make time for life and be grateful. There’s a common if
not overused saying. Never get so busy making a living that you forget to make
a life. It may sound cliche but it’s true. During my degree, I experienced the loss
of a parent and a sibling. There were a thousand moments with my dad and my big
brother that I took for granted simply because I expected a thousand
more. Learn from my mistakes. Don’t worry too much about the stuff that doesn’t
need worrying. Make time to consciously be grateful for lazy Sundays,
cheap avocados, Dad jokes, bad memes and good dogs. Make time for life. Rather than
ending these life lessons from UWA with the cliched pursue the impossible, I’d
like to leave you with a similar but more expansive quote from the great
English author Douglas Adams. Let’s think the unthinkable, let’s do the un-doable,
let us prepare to grapple with the ineffable itself and see if we may not ineff
it after all. Thank you. Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for your
participation in today’s proceedings which has made it a memorable occasion
for all the graduates. I particularly wish to thank Ms Fadzi Whande for
giving the graduation address and Jessica Moran for the valedictory
address which you’ve just heard. Both of them have enriched these proceedings
with their perspectives. To all the new graduates, I offer my warm
congratulations. As UWA graduates, your achievements will enhance the reputation
of this University. We hope you will keep in touch with us over the coming years
to let us know what you are doing and that you will retain a lifelong
connection as a part of the University community. The ceremony is now concluded
and I invite you to join us on Whitfeld courts for light refreshments.
Members of the audience are asked to rise and remain standing in their places until the procession, including the new graduates, has left the hall.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *