Venedig, Dolomiterna, Gardasjön och Valpocella – Gone Camping med guldkant i norra Italien

Venedig, Dolomiterna, Gardasjön och Valpocella – Gone Camping med guldkant i norra Italien


For us campers, Punta Sabbioni
is a perfect starting place. There are about ten campsites
within just a few kilometers. One of them is Miramare,
where we are now. Best of all, it’s easy to catch a boat to
one of the world’s most beautiful cities. Since we’re going to Venice, it feels right
to take a waterbus, or “vaporetto”. The trip from Punta Sabbioni
takes about 30 minutes. I suggest getting off at Piazza San Marco
and riding the elevator up at Campanile. From the bell tower,
you get a wonderful view of Venice and get a feel for how the city’s 170
canals and 450 bridges are connected. We actually owe Venice’s existence
to barbarians. In the 7th century,
they invaded the northern coast of Italy. This made the inhabitants
escape to the islands and eventually set up their own republic
of merchants, craftsmen and artists. It’s the result of their success
that we can enjoy today. The Republic of Venice
used to be called “La Serenissima”, which means “the most serene”, but the lack of elevation
is the biggest threat to the city. There are lots of foot-bridges ready
to be deployed when the sea rises. The most popular activity
is to go on a gondola ride. These vessels
have ferried passengers for 900 years. Maneuvering these asymmetric vessels
with a sculling oar is quite a challenge. It takes 4-6 years
to become a skilled gondolier. If you don’t want to pay full price
for a gondola ride, maybe SEK 1,000, there is a cheaper way
to get a gondola ride. It’s called “traghetto”
and it costs 2 euros. Crossing over only takes two minutes. Gondola ride – check. It’s hard not to marvel
at how beautiful the city is, but also at
how many tourists there are here. I have two tips.
One is to lose yourself in the back alleys and the other is to stay past 6 p.m.,
when the buses head home. Then it feels like
you have Venice to yourself. The next morning,
we drive from the lowest parts of Italy to the highest part of the country
– the Dolomites. It only takes three hours and
the way there is full of spectacular views that I have trouble getting enough of. This is where we find
one of the world’s best campsites. Caravan Park Sexten sits
at 1,520 meters above sea level and is like a regular campsite,
but with extra everything. The lots are bigger, the equipment
more modern and the view hard to beat. The price is more
than you pay at a regular campsite, but I think you should give yourself
and your RV a night or two here. If you reserve a luxury spot,
you get some really nice things. You get your own bathroom
and this smart terminal behind me, where you empty your waste water
and get electricity and fresh water. The cabins are also really special. Caravan Park Sexten
is open year-round, and the camping lots range
from 80 to 250 square meters. You also get access to three restaurants
and a spa center. Lake Garda is Italy’s largest lake
and quite a sight with its cozy coastal villages
and magnificent residences. But we’re here because this
is where we find the district Valpolicella, which produces
some of Italy’s most famous wines, such as Amarone. 2,000 years ago, the Romans
started making wine from dried grapes. Instead of picking grapes
in September-October, they left them on the vines
for a few months. The process has been refined
and gotten us today’s Amarone wines. It’s a type of wine loved by Swedes. Not counting bag-in-box,
Amarone makes up 45% of all red wines over SEK 150
that are sold in Sweden. The GPS makes it easy
to visit the local vineyards to sample and learn more about
how these crown jewels are made. And if you find something you like,
there’s lots of room. I’m taking you to Massimago, an award-winning producer in eastern
Valpolicella that really stands out. Guests can stay at the vineyard
in apartments with room for 18 people. And the business is run by a young girl. Camilla Rossi Chauvenet entered
the wine arena in 2003, at age 20. She wanted to turn the family’s
run-down vineyard into a top producer. In 2004,
they produced a modest 1,000 bottles. Today, she grows 27 acres
and produces 45,000 bottles a year. The greatest part of making
a good Amarone is selecting the grapes. It’s absolutely the most important thing, but also the funniest
and most interesting part. Select different properties,
different parcels, and understand how a single parcel could give you
a completely different taste. If I could be a painter,
my big painting would be the Amarone, and the colors would be the parcels. The grapes
are harvested by hand in September and placed in a large warehouse,
where fans keep the air circulating. This method is called “appassimento”. Grapes are left here for three months,
until they lose 40% of their weight. The wine is matured
in French oak barrels for two years and then in bottles for twelve months. I really think that the food matching
is not so important with Amarone, because I think
the perfect match should be people. The right people at the right moment with the right emotional sensation,
emotional time. At a business dinner
or a romantic dinner, the same wine is going
to taste completely different. Once you try Amarone,
you’re likely to remember it. I would describe it as a giant bear hug giving every taste bud
an explosion of wine fireworks. There are plenty of campsites
to choose from. I check in at Le Palme Camping, offering
110 lots of 50-100 square meters. Smaller vehicles are preferable. There are also about 60 cabins
with good standard. The facility is terraced
and slopes down towards Lake Garda. The beach is nothing special,
but the view is magnificent. I went to the village
and bought goodies. Some prosciutto ham
and Parmesan cheese. We’ll have more of a snack today and focus more on the wine. Place a piece of ham
on the cutting board. We’ll take some pesto
and spread it on the ham. Like so. Grissini, breadsticks. I’ll put one here
and roll it into a kind of lollipop. That’s one done. I’ll just keep going. I’m breaking off
pieces of Parmesan with a knife. They can be any size. And then some olives. Here we have tonight’s snacks – grissini
sticks with pesto, olives and Parmesan. And of course a nice Amarone. Thanks for joining us
through northern Italy. I hope to see you again
on this channel or out on the roads. While in Italy, we visited Venice. We drove around in the Dolomites
and visited the vineyard Massimago. We stayed at Camping Miramare, Caravan Park Sexten
and Le Palme Camping.

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